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The new entry-level driver training (ELDT) rule takes full effect on February 7th. Before any driver may obtain a Class A or B CDL or a hazmat, passenger, or school bus endorsement, the driver must complete a training program provided by an entity listed on the FMCSA’s Training Provider Registry. The registry ensures that entry-level CMV drivers complete training as required by the rule.

The ELDT regulations are not retroactive, however. Individuals issued a CDL or an S, P, or H endorsement prior to Feb. 7, 2022, are not required to complete training for the respective CDL or endorsement. If an applicant who obtains a CLP prior to Feb. 7, 2022, obtains a CDL before the CLP or renewed CLP expires, the applicant is also not subject to the ELDT rule. Moreover, any individual who meets an exception for taking a skills test in 49 CFR 383 is exempt from the ELDT rule.

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Most Recent Highlights In Environmental

2024-05-03T05:00:00Z

EPA Proposed Rule: Regulations Related to Project Emissions Accounting

In this action, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing revisions to the preconstruction permitting regulations that apply to modifications at existing major stationary sources in the New Source Review (NSR) program under the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). The proposed revisions include revising the definition of “project” in the NSR regulations, adding additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements applicable to minor modifications at existing major stationary sources, and proposing to require that decreases accounted for in the Step 1 significant emissions increase calculation be enforceable.

DATES: This proposed rule is published in the Federal Register May 3, 2024, page 36870.

View proposed rule.

Beyond the acronyms: A guide to Tier II vs. TRI reporting
2024-05-03T05:00:00Z

Beyond the acronyms: A guide to Tier II vs. TRI reporting

Environmental reporting can be confusing, especially when it comes to terms like Tier II and TRI. I'll never forget my first job in the environmental field. I was tasked with sorting through the records of my predecessor for the upcoming reporting season. Tier II reporting seemed straightforward enough — a basic inventory of what we had on-site. Then there was TRI, which, quite frankly, looked like Tier II's evil twin at the time.

I'll forever be grateful to a senior coworker who, in an attempt to set me straight, likened Tier II reporting to a fire drill and TRI reporting to a full-blown fire inspection. The alphabet soup of acronyms started to make sense. Both reports are related to chemicals; however, they have different focuses, reporting thresholds, and target audiences.

Tier II: Informing the community

Tier II reporting falls under Section 312 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA). It’s designed to inform local emergency responders and communities about the hazardous materials stored at a facility. This knowledge allows emergency personnel to be better prepared for potential accidents involving hazardous substances.

What to report: Tier II focuses on a broader range of hazardous materials compared to TRI. It covers flammable liquids, compressed gases, health hazards, and reactive chemicals exceeding specific threshold quantities (typically 500 pounds or 55 gallons for most chemicals).

Reporting format: Facilities are required to submit a Tier II Hazardous Chemical Inventory form by March 1 each year. It includes details about the identity, quantity, location, and hazards of each hazardous material stored on-site. Keep in mind that some states may have specific requirements for reporting and submission of the Tier II inventory form and/or the state reporting form or format.

TRI: Tracking toxic releases

The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program, established under Section 313 of EPCRA, serves a different purpose. It focuses on tracking the release, use, and transfer of specific toxic chemicals listed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

What to report: TRI requires reporting on a specific list of toxic chemicals that exceed certain thresholds. These thresholds are typically 25,000 pounds for manufacturing or processing activities and 10,000 pounds for other uses. The list includes chemicals that are known or suspected to cause harm to human health or the environment.

Reporting format: Facilities that exceed the thresholds must submit a Form R by July 1 each year, which provides detailed information about the listed chemicals. It includes the quantities of the chemicals used, manufactured, processed, released (into the air, water, or land), and transferred off-site.

Have a question for our Compliance Experts? If you have safety or compliance questions, we encourage you to use Compliance Network’s Expert Help tool. Mishka Binns and our team of Compliance Experts will respond to your question within 24 business hours.

2024-05-03T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: Withdrawal of Designated Disposal Sites; Nome, Alaska

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking direct final action to withdraw from EPA regulation and management two designated ocean dredged material disposal sites, the Nome East and Nome West Sites (Sites), located near Nome, Alaska, pursuant to the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA), as amended. The EPA is taking this action because the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has not used the Sites for disposal of dredged material since 2009, has no plans to use the Sites for any future disposal of dredged material, and the Sites are no longer suitable for USACE's needs. This action will withdraw these sites from the regulations.

DATES: This rule is effective on August 1, 2024 published in the Federal Register May 3, 2024, page 36681.

§228.15 Dumping sites designated on a final basis.
(n)(12) and (13)Removed and reservedView text
2024-04-26T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: PFAS National Primary Drinking Water Regulation

In March 2023, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed and requested comment on the National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) and health-based Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs) for six per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS): perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), hexafluoropropylene oxide dimer acid (HFPO-DA, commonly known as GenX Chemicals), and perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS). After consideration of public comment and consistent with the provisions set forth under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), the EPA is finalizing NPDWRs for these six PFAS. Through this action, the EPA is finalizing MCLGs for PFOA and PFOS at zero. Considering feasibility, the EPA is promulgating individual Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for PFOA and PFOS at 4.0 nanograms per liter (ng/L) or parts per trillion (ppt). The EPA is also finalizing individual MCLGs and is promulgating individual MCLs for PFHxS, PFNA, and HFPO-DA at 10 ng/L. In addition to the individual MCLs for PFHxS, PFNA, and HFPO-DA, in consideration of the known toxic effects, dose additive health concerns and occurrence and likely co-occurrence in drinking water of these three PFAS, as well as PFBS, the EPA is finalizing a Hazard Index (HI) of 1 (unitless) as the MCLG and MCL for any mixture containing two or more of PFHxS, PFNA, HFPO-DA, and PFBS. Once fully implemented, the EPA estimates that the rule will prevent thousands of deaths and reduce tens of thousands of serious PFAS-attributable illnesses.

DATES: This final rule is effective on June 25, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 26, 2024, page 32532.

View final rule.

2024-04-25T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: Revisions and Confidentiality Determinations for Data Elements Under the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule

The EPA is amending specific provisions in the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule to improve data quality and consistency. This action updates the General Provisions to reflect revised global warming potentials; expands reporting to additional sectors; improves the calculation, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements by updating existing methodologies; improves data verifications; and provides for collection of additional data to better inform and be relevant to a wide variety of Clean Air Act provisions that the EPA carries out. This action adds greenhouse gas monitoring and reporting for five source categories including coke calcining; ceramics manufacturing; calcium carbide production; caprolactam, glyoxal, and glyoxylic acid production; and facilities conducting geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide with enhanced oil recovery. These revisions also include changes that will improve implementation of the rule such as updates to applicability estimation methodologies, simplifying calculation and monitoring methodologies, streamlining recordkeeping and reporting, and other minor technical corrections or clarifications. This action also establishes and amends confidentiality determinations for the reporting of certain data elements to be added or substantially revised in these amendments.

DATES: This rule is effective January 1, 2025, published in the Federal Register April 25, 2024, page 31802.

View final rule.

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Most Recent Highlights In Transportation

EHS Monthly Round Up - March 2024

EHS Monthly Round Up - March 2024

In this monthly roundup video, we’ll review the most impactful environmental, safety, and health news.

Hi everyone! Welcome to the monthly news roundup video, where we’ll go over the most impactful environmental, health, and safety news. Please view the content links in the transcript for more information about the topics I’ll be covering today. Let’s get started! The Office of Management and Budget completed its review of OSHA’s worker walkaround final rule on March 20. The next step is publication in the Federal Register. The rule expands the criteria for who employees can authorize to act as their representative during an OSHA inspection.

Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week was held the week of March 25. This annual event brings attention to hazards in the grain handling and storage industry and encourages employers to focus on safe work practices.

Over 100 people die in ladder-related deaths each year, and thousands more suffer disabling injuries. During Ladder Safety Month, which is held each March, the American Ladder Institute promotes ladder safety to decrease the number of injuries and fatalities.

Between 2010 and 2023, 11 miners drowned in incidents involving submerged mobile equipment. In response, the Mine Safety and Health Administration issued a safety alert. It recommends measures miners should take when operating equipment near water.

And finally, turning to environmental news, EPA finalized amendments to its Risk Management Program in an effort to improve safety at facilities that use and distribute hazardous chemicals. The rule seeks to improve chemical process safety; assist in planning for, preparing for, and responding to accidents; and increase public awareness of chemical hazards at regulated sites.

Thanks for tuning in to the monthly news roundup. We’ll see you next month!

2024-04-22T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Heavy-Duty Vehicles—Phase 3

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is promulgating new greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for model year (MY) 2032 and later heavy-duty highway vehicles that phase in starting as early MY 2027 for certain vehicle categories. The phase in revises certain MY 2027 GHG standards that were established previously under EPA's Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles—Phase 2 rule (“HD GHG Phase 2”). This document also updates discrete elements of the Averaging Banking and Trading program, including providing additional flexibilities for manufacturers to support the implementation of the Phase 3 program balanced by limiting the availability of certain advanced technology credits initially established under the HD GHG Phase 2 rule. EPA is also adding warranty requirements for batteries and other components of zero-emission vehicles and requiring customer-facing battery state-of-health monitors for plug-in hybrid and battery electric vehicles. In this action, we are also finalizing additional revisions, including clarifying and editorial amendments to certain highway heavy-duty vehicle provisions and certain test procedures for heavy-duty engines.

DATES: This final rule is effective on June 21, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 22, 2024, page 29440.

View final rule.

EPA designates 2 PFAS as CERCLA hazardous substances
2024-04-19T05:00:00Z

EPA designates 2 PFAS as CERCLA hazardous substances

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a rule to designate two widely used PFAS — perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), including their salts and structural isomers — as hazardous substances under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA).

The rule requires entities to immediately report releases of PFOA and PFOS that meet or exceed the reportable quantity (1 pound) to the:

  • National Response Center,
  • State/tribal emergency response commission, and
  • Local/tribal emergency planning committee.

Further, it gives EPA the authority to hold polluters responsible for paying for or conducting investigations and cleanup of PFOA and PFOS releases. In a memorandum, EPA clarified that it will focus enforcement efforts on significant contributors to PFAS releases.

Additionally:

  • Federal entities that transfer or sell property must give notification about the storage, release, or disposal of PFOA and PFAS on the property and include in the deed a commitment that either:
    • Warrants it has cleaned up any contamination, or
    • If needed, it will do so in the future.
  • Section 306 of CERCLA requires the Department of Transportation to list and regulate PFOA and PFAS as hazardous substances under the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act.

The rule takes effect 60 days after it’s published in the Federal Register.

Key to remember: EPA has designated PFOA and PFOS as CERCLA hazardous substances, requiring immediate release notifications for the two PFAS and expanding the agency’s authority to hold parties responsible for contamination accountable.

Chemical Data Reporting: 5 tips for a winning report
2024-04-19T05:00:00Z

Chemical Data Reporting: 5 tips for a winning report

It’s time for that special event that happens once every four years, often testing the endurance of the participants who’ve spent the prior years preparing for this very moment. No, it’s not the Summer Olympics, though that’s a great guess. It’s the Chemical Data Report!

Under the Toxic Substances Control ACT (TSCA), the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requires manufacturers (including importers) to report information on the production and use of chemicals in commerce if they meet certain production volume thresholds at any one site. The submission period for the 2024 report runs from June 1 to September 30, 2024.

Use these tips to help you complete a Chemical Data Report worthy of a gold medal.

Tip #1: Verify that your facility is covered.

The TSCA Chemical Substance Inventory (TSCA Inventory) lists the covered chemical substances. Generally, the production volume threshold is 25,000 pounds or more of a chemical substance at a site. However, a reduced reporting threshold (2,500 pounds) applies to chemical substances subject to:

  • A rule proposed or promulgated under TSCA Sections 5(a)(2), 5(b)(4), or 6;
  • An order issued under TSCA Sections 4, 5(e), or 5(f); or
  • A relief granted under a civil action under TSCA Sections 5 or 7.

Further, certain full and partial exemptions apply to facilities based on the:

  • Chemical substances,
  • Size of the business, and/or
  • Activities conducted.

To confirm whether your facility must report:

  • Check the most recent nonconfidential TSCA Inventory, which you can download from EPA’s website or access through its electronic CDR reporting tool (e-CDRweb);
  • Search the Substance Registry Services (SRS), accessible through e-CDRweb, to determine if any of the facility’s chemical substances are subject to TSCA actions;
  • Search the SRS for chemical substances on the confidential portion of the inventory (by TSCA Accession Numbers or generic chemical names); and
  • Examine the regulations at 40 CFR Part 711 to determine whether your facility qualifies for any reporting exemptions.

Tip #2: If a chemical substance is reportable for one year, you must report its production volume for all years.

The CDR rule requires facilities to report the total annual production volume of covered chemical substances for each calendar year since the last principal reporting year.

In other words, if a chemical substance at your facility meets or exceeds the corresponding reporting threshold during any calendar year covered by the report, you must include the total annual production volume of that chemical for every covered calendar year.

For example, you must list on the 2024 report the production volumes of every reportable chemical substance for 2020, 2021, 2022, and 2023.

Tip #3: The CDR form is site-specific, not chemical-specific.

All CDR data must be reported electronically on Form U (EPA Form 7740-8) through e-CDRweb on EPA’s Central Data Exchange (CDX) system. Reporting is site-specific, so if your organization has multiple sites with reportable chemicals, you must submit a Form U for each site.

Keep in mind that you submit only one form per site, so all reportable chemical substances at a specific site are listed on the same Form U. You may have to submit multiple forms only if you have more than one site covered by the CDR rule.

Tip #4: Register for the right CDX user role.

To submit a Chemical Data Report, you must first register with the CDX system and be approved by EPA. Plus, you must register the name of the organization on whose behalf you’re submitting a Form U. If you’re already registered on CDX, you can add the CDR reporting flow to your current registration.

Because each type of user role has varying permissions, it’s essential to register for the right one. User roles include:

  • Primary Authorized Officials,
  • Secondary Authorized Officials,
  • Primary Support,
  • Secondary Support,
  • Primary Agent/Consultant, and
  • Secondary Agent/Consultant.

Only Primary Authorized Officials may submit initial Chemical Data Reports. So, if you’re the one who will submit Form U, confirm that you’re registered as a Primary Authorized Official.

Tip #5: You’re not done when you submit the report.

The CDR rule requires organizations to keep records of all CDR information reported on Form U to EPA for at least five years (711.25). The five-year timeline begins on the last day of the submission period.

Additionally, you may have to amend Form U after submitting the initial report. This can apply if:

  • You find errors or omissions during a self-audit of the Chemical Data Report,
  • You receive newly available information,
  • You believe the organization may have violated reporting requirements, or
  • EPA finds errors or omissions (in which case, the agency will likely send a letter requiring you to make corrections within a specific time frame).

Key to remember: The Chemical Data Report can be a major undertaking, but with these tips, you can cross the finish line with a report worthy of a gold medal.

2024-04-18T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: Emissions Standards for 2027 and Later Light Duty and Medium-Duty Vehicles

Under the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is establishing new, more protective emissions standards for criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) for light-duty vehicles and Class 2b and 3 (‘‘medium-duty’’) vehicles that will phase-in over model years 2027 through 2032. In addition, EPA is finalizing GHG program revisions in several areas, including off-cycle and air conditioning credits, the treatment of upstream emissions associated with zero-emission vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in compliance calculations, medium-duty vehicle incentive multipliers, and vehicle certification and compliance. EPA is also establishing new standards to control refueling emissions from incomplete medium-duty vehicles, and battery durability and warranty requirements for light-duty and medium-duty electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. EPA is also finalizing minor amendments to update program requirements related to aftermarket fuel conversions, importing vehicles and engines, evaporative emission test procedures, and test fuel specifications for measuring fuel economy.

DATES: This final rule is effective on June 17, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 18, 2024, page 27842.

View final rule.

See More

Most Recent Highlights In Safety & Health

2024-04-17T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: Other Solid Waste Incinerators; Air Curtain Incinerators Title V Permitting Provisionss

On August 31, 2020, in accordance with requirements under the Clean Air Act (CAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a 5-year review of the Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emissions Guidelines for Existing Sources: Other Solid Waste Incineration (OSWI) Units, which includes certain very small municipal waste combustion (VSMWC) and institutional waste incineration (IWI) units. In the same action, the EPA proposed to remove the title V permitting requirements for air curtain incinerators (ACI) that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, yard waste, or a mixture of these three types of waste. In response to supportive comments received on the August 2020 proposal, this action is finalizing, as proposed, to remove the title V permitting requirements for ACIs that only burn wood waste, clean lumber, yard waste, or a mixture of those, and are not located at title V major sources or subject to title V for other reasons. The EPA is finalizing this proposed action now to simplify the compliance obligations for owners and operators of these types of units.

DATES: The effective date of this rule is April 17, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 17, 2024, page 27392.

View final rule.

§60.2966 Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my unit?
Entire sectionRevisedView text
§60.2967 When must I submit a title V permit application for my new unit?
Entire sectionRevisedView text
§60.2969 What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in disaster recovery?
Entire sectionRemoved and reservedView text
§60.2974 Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?
Entire sectionRemoved and reservedView text
Subpart FFFF - Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before December 9, 2004
HeadingRevisedView text
§60.3059 Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my unit?
Entire sectionRevisedView text
§60.3060 When must I submit a title V permit application for my existing unit?
Entire sectionRemoved and reservedView text

Previous Text

§60.2966 Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my unit?

Yes, if you are subject to this subpart, you are required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit unless you meet the relevant requirements for an exemption specified in §60.2887.

§60.2967 When must I submit a title V permit application for my new unit?

(a) If your new unit subject to this subpart is not subject to an earlier permit application deadline, a complete title V permit application must be submitted on or before one of the dates specified in paragraphs (a)(1) or (2) of this section. (See section 503(c) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.5(a)(1)(i) and 40 CFR 71.5(a)(1)(i).)

(1) For a unit that commenced operation as a new source as of December 16, 2005, then a complete title V permit application must be submitted not later than December 18, 2006.

(2) For a unit that does not commence operation as a new source until after December 16, 2005, then a complete title V permit application must be submitted not later than 12 months after the date the unit commences operation as a new source.

(b) If your new unit subject to this subpart is subject to title V as a result of some triggering requirement(s) other than this subpart (for example, a unit subject to this subpart may be a major source or part of a major source), then your unit may be required to apply for a title V permit prior to the deadlines specified in paragraph (a) of this section. If more than one requirement triggers a source's obligation to apply for a title V permit, the 12-month timeframe for filing a title V permit application is triggered by the requirement that first causes the source to be subject to title V. (See section 503(c) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.3(a) and (b), 40 CFR 70.5(a)(1)(i), 40 CFR 71.3(a) and (b), and 40 CFR 71.5(a)(1)(i).)

(c) A “complete” title V permit application is one that has been determined or deemed complete by the relevant permitting authority under section 503(d) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.5(a)(2) or 40 CFR 71.5(a)(2). You must submit a complete permit application by the relevant application deadline in order to operate after this date in compliance with Federal law. (See sections 503(d) and 502(a) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.7(b) and 40 CFR 71.7(b).)

Subpart FFFF - Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before December 9, 2004

§60.3059 Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my unit?

Yes, if you are subject to an applicable EPA-approved and effective Clean Air Act section 111(d)/129 State or Tribal plan or an applicable and effective Federal plan, you are required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit unless you meet the relevant requirements for an exemption specified in §60.2993.

2024-04-16T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: Clean Water Act Methods Update Rule for the Analysis of Effluent

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is finalizing changes to its test procedures required to be used by industries and municipalities when analyzing the chemical, physical, and biological properties of wastewater and other samples for reporting under the EPA's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit program. The Clean Water Act requires the EPA to promulgate these test procedures (analytical methods) for analysis of pollutants. The EPA anticipates that these changes will provide increased flexibility for the regulated community in meeting monitoring requirements while improving data quality. In addition, this update to the CWA methods will incorporate technological advances in analytical technology and make a series of minor changes and corrections to existing approved methods. As such, the EPA expects that these changes will not result in any negative economic impacts.

DATES: This final rule is effective on June 17, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 16, 2024, page 27288.

View final rule.

§136.3 Identification of test procedures.
(a), tables IA, IB, IC, ID, and IHRevisedView text
(b)RevisedView text
(e), table II, Footnote “5”RevisedView text

New Text

§136.3 Identification of test procedures.

(a)

* * * *

Table IA—List of Approved Biological Methods for Wastewater and Sewage Sludge
Parameter and unitsMethod 1EPAStandard methodsAOAC, ASTM, USGSOther
Table IA notes:
1 The method must be specified when results are reported.
2 A 0.45-µm membrane filter (MF) or other pore size certified by the manufacturer to fully retain organisms to be cultivated and to be free of extractables which could interfere with their growth.
3 Microbiological Methods for Monitoring the Environment, Water and Wastes, EPA/600/8-78/017. 1978. US EPA.
4 U.S. Geological Survey Techniques of Water-Resource Investigations, Book 5, Laboratory Analysis, Chapter A4, Methods for Collection and Analysis of Aquatic Biological and Microbiological Samples. 1989. USGS.
5 Because the MF technique usually yields low and variable recovery from chlorinated wastewaters, the Most Probable Number method will be required to resolve any controversies.
6 Tests must be conducted to provide organism enumeration (density). Select the appropriate configuration of tubes/filtrations and dilutions/volumes to account for the quality, character, consistency, and anticipated organism density of the water sample.
7 When the MF method has been used previously to test waters with high turbidity, large numbers of noncoliform bacteria, or samples that may contain organisms stressed by chlorine, a parallel test should be conducted with a multiple-tube technique to demonstrate applicability and comparability of results.
8 To assess the comparability of results obtained with individual methods, it is suggested that side-by-side tests be conducted across seasons of the year with the water samples routinely tested in accordance with the most current Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater or EPA alternate test procedure (ATP) guidelines.
9 Annual Book of ASTM Standards—Water and Environmental Technology, Section 11.02. 2000, 1999, 1996. ASTM International.
10 Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International. 16th Edition, 4th Revision, 1998. AOAC International.
11 Recommended for enumeration of target organism in sewage sludge.
12 The multiple-tube fermentation test is used in 9221B.2-2014. Lactose broth may be used in lieu of lauryl tryptose broth (LTB), if at least 25 parallel tests are conducted between this broth and LTB using the water samples normally tested, and this comparison demonstrates that the false-positive rate and false-negative rate for total coliform using lactose broth is less than 10 percent. No requirement exists to run the completed phase on 10 percent of all total coliform-positive tubes on a seasonal basis.
13 These tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests.
14 After prior enrichment in a presumptive medium for total coliform using 9221B.2-2014, all presumptive tubes or bottles showing any amount of gas, growth or acidity within 48 h ± 3 h of incubation shall be submitted to 9221F-2014. Commercially available EC-MUG media or EC media supplemented in the laboratory with 50 µg/mL of MUG may be used.
15 Method 1680: Fecal Coliforms in Sewage Sludge (Biosolids) by Multiple-Tube Fermentation Using Lauryl-Tryptose Broth (LTB) and EC Medium, EPA-821-R-14-009. September 2014. U.S. EPA.
16 Samples shall be enumerated by the multiple-tube or multiple-well procedure. Using multiple-tube procedures, employ an appropriate tube and dilution configuration of the sample as needed and report the Most Probable Number (MPN). Samples tested with Colilert® may be enumerated with the multiple-well procedures, Quanti-Tray® or Quanti-Tray®/2000 and the MPN calculated from the table provided by the manufacturer.
17 Colilert-18® is an optimized formulation of the Colilert® for the determination of total coliforms and E. coli that provides results within 18 h of incubation at 35°C rather than the 24 h required for the Colilert® test and is recommended for marine water samples.
18 Descriptions of the Colilert®, Colilert-18®, Quanti-Tray®, and Quanti-Tray®/2000 may be obtained from IDEXX Laboratories, Inc.
19 A description of the mColiBlue24® test is available from Hach Company.
20 Method 1681: Fecal Coliforms in Sewage Sludge (Biosolids) by Multiple-Tube Fermentation Using A-1 Medium, EPA-821-R-06-013. July 2006. U.S. EPA.
21 Method 1603.1: Escherichia coli ( E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar (Modified mTEC), EPA-821-R-23-008. September 2023. U.S. EPA.
22 Method 1682: Salmonella in Sewage Sludge (Biosolids) by Modified Semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) Medium, EPA-821-R-14-012. September 2014. U.S. EPA.
23 A description of the Enterolert® test may be obtained from IDEXX Laboratories Inc.
24 Method 1600.1: Enterococci in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Membrane-Enterococcus Indoxyl-β-D-Glucoside Agar (mEI), EPA-821-R-23-006. September 2023. U.S. EPA.
25 Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms, EPA-821-R-02-012. Fifth Edition, October 2002. U.S. EPA; and U.S. EPA Whole Effluent Toxicity Methods Errata Sheet, EPA 821-R-02-012-ES. December 2016.
26 Short-term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, EPA-821-R-02-013. Fourth Edition, October 2002. U.S. EPA; and U.S. EPA Whole Effluent Toxicity Methods Errata Sheet, EPA 821-R-02-012-ES. December 2016.
27 Short-term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Marine and Estuarine Organisms, EPA-821-R-02-014. Third Edition, October 2002. U.S. EPA; and U.S. EPA Whole Effluent Toxicity Methods Errata Sheet, EPA 821-R-02-012-ES. December 2016.
28 To use Colilert-18® to assay for fecal coliforms, the incubation temperature is 44.5 ± 0.2 °C, and a water bath incubator is used.
29 On a monthly basis, at least ten blue colonies from positive samples must be verified using Lauryl Tryptose Broth and EC broth, followed by count adjustment based on these results; and representative non-blue colonies should be verified using Lauryl Tryptose Broth. Where possible, verifications should be done from randomized sample sources.
30 On a monthly basis, at least ten sheen colonies from positive samples must be verified using lauryl tryptose broth and brilliant green lactose bile broth, followed by count adjustment based on these results; and representative non-sheen colonies should be verified using lauryl tryptose broth. Where possible, verifications should be done from randomized sample sources.
31 Subject coliform positive samples determined by 9222 B-2015 or other membrane filter procedure to 9222 I-2015 using NA-MUG media.
32 Verification of colonies by incubation of BHI agar at 10 ± 0.5 °C for 48 ± 3 h is optional. As per the Errata to the 23rd Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater “Growth on a BHI agar plate incubated at 10 ± 0.5 °C for 48 ± 3 h is further verification that the colony belongs to the genus Enterococcus.”
33 9221F. 2-2014 allows for simultaneous detection of E. coli and thermotolerant fecal coliforms by adding inverted vials to EC-MUG; the inverted vials collect gas produced by thermotolerant fecal coliforms.
Bacteria
1. Coliform (fecal), number per gram dry weightMost Probable Number (MPN), 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 132, 3 1680, 1115 1681 11209221 E-2014.
Membrane filter (MF), 25 single stepp. 124 39222 D-2015. 29
2. Coliform (fecal), number per 100 mLMPN, 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 132 39221 E-2014, 9221 F-2014. 33
Multiple tube/multiple well, orColilert-18®. 131828
MF, 25 single step 5p. 124 39222 D-2015 29B-0050-85. 4
3. Coliform (total), number per 100 mLMPN, 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 114 39221 B-2014.
MF, 25 single step orp. 108 39222 B-2015 30B-0025-85. 4
MF, 25 two step with enrichmentp. 111 39222 B-2015. 30
4. E. coli, number per 100 mLMPN 6816 multiple tube, or9221 B2014/9221 F-2014. 121433
multiple tube/multiple well, or9223 B-2016 13991.15 10Colilert®. 1318 Colilert-18®. 131718
MF, 25678 two step, or9222 B-2015/9222 I-2015. 31
Single step1603.1 21m-ColiBlue24®. 19
5. Fecal streptococci, number per 100 mLMPN, 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 139 39230 B-2013.
MF, 2 orp. 136 39230 C-2013 32B-0055-85. 4
Plate countp. 143. 3
6. Enterococci, number per 100 mLMPN, 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 139 39230 B-2013.
MPN, 68 multiple tube/multiple well, or9230 D-2013D6503-99 9Enterolert®. 1323
MF 25678 single step or1600.1 249230 C-2013. 32
Plate countp. 143. 3
7. Salmonella , number per gram dry weight 11MPN multiple tube1682. 22
Aquatic Toxicity
8. Toxicity, acute, fresh water organisms, LC 50 , percent effluentWater flea, Cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia dubia acute2002.0. 25
Water flea, Cladocerans, Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna acute2021.0. 25
Fish, Fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and Bannerfin shiner, Cyprinella leedsi, acute2000.0. 25
Fish, Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, acute2019.0. 25
9. Toxicity, acute, estuarine and marine organisms of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, LC 50 , percent effluentMysid, Mysidopsis bahia, acute2007.0. 25
Fish, Sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, acute2004.0. 25
Fish, Silverside, Menidia beryllina, Menidia menidia, and Menidia peninsulae, acute2006.0. 25
10. Toxicity, chronic, fresh water organisms, NOEC or IC 25 , percent effluentFish, Fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, larval survival and growth1000.0. 26
Fish, Fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity1001.0. 26
Water flea, Cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia dubia, survival and reproduction1002.0. 26
Green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum, growth1003.0. 26
11. Toxicity, chronic, estuarine and marine organisms of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, NOEC or IC 25 , percent effluentFish, Sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, larval survival and growth.1004.0. 27
Fish, Sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity1005.0. 27
Fish, Inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, larval survival and growth1006.0. 27
Mysid, Mysidopsis bahia, survival, growth, and fecundity1007.0. 27
Sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, fertilization1008.0. 27

Table IB—List of Approved Inorganic Test Procedures
ParameterMethodology 58EPA 52Standard methods 84ASTMUSGS/AOAC/Other
Table IB Notes:
1 Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes, EPA-600/4-79-020. Revised March 1983 and 1979, where applicable. U.S. EPA.
2 Methods for Analysis of Inorganic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, Techniques of Water-Resource Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A1., unless otherwise stated. 1989. USGS.
3 Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Methods Manual, Sixteenth Edition, 4th Revision, 1998. AOAC International.
4 For the determination of total metals (which are equivalent to total recoverable metals) the sample is not filtered before processing. A digestion procedure is required to solubilize analytes in suspended material and to break down organic-metal complexes (to convert the analyte to a detectable form for colorimetric analysis). For non-platform graphite furnace atomic absorption determinations, a digestion using nitric acid (as specified in Section 4.1.3 of Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes) is required prior to analysis. The procedure used should subject the sample to gentle acid refluxing, and at no time should the sample be taken to dryness. For direct aspiration flame atomic absorption (FLAA) determinations, a combination acid (nitric and hydrochloric acids) digestion is preferred, prior to analysis. The approved total recoverable digestion is described as Method 200.2 in Supplement I of “Methods for the Determination of Metals in Environmental Samples” EPA/600R-94/111, May 1994, and is reproduced in EPA Methods 200.7, 200.8, and 200.9 from the same Supplement. However, when using the gaseous hydride technique or for the determination of certain elements such as antimony, arsenic, selenium, silver, and tin by non-EPA graphite furnace atomic absorption methods, mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption, the noble metals and titanium by FLAA, a specific or modified sample digestion procedure may be required, and, in all cases the referenced method write-up should be consulted for specific instruction and/or cautions. For analyses using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), the direct current plasma (DCP) technique or EPA spectrochemical techniques (platform furnace AA, ICP-AES, and ICP-MS), use EPA Method 200.2 or an approved alternate procedure ( e.g., CEM microwave digestion, which may be used with certain analytes as indicated in this table IB); the total recoverable digestion procedures in EPA Methods 200.7, 200.8, and 200.9 may be used for those respective methods. Regardless of the digestion procedure, the results of the analysis after digestion procedure are reported as “total” metals.
5 Copper sulfate or other catalysts that have been found suitable may be used in place of mercuric sulfate.
6 Manual distillation is not required if comparability data on representative effluent samples are on file to show that this preliminary distillation step is not necessary; however, manual distillation will be required to resolve any controversies. In general, the analytical method should be consulted regarding the need for distillation. If the method is not clear, the laboratory may compare a minimum of 9 different sample matrices to evaluate the need for distillation. For each matrix, a matrix spike and matrix spike duplicate are analyzed both with and without the distillation step (for a total of 36 samples, assuming 9 matrices). If results are comparable, the laboratory may dispense with the distillation step for future analysis. Comparable is defined as <20% RPD for all tested matrices). Alternatively, the two populations of spike recovery percentages may be compared using a recognized statistical test.
7 Industrial Method Number 379-75 WE Ammonia, Automated Electrode Method, Technicon Auto Analyzer II. February 19, 1976. Bran & Luebbe Analyzing Technologies Inc.
8 The approved method is that cited in Methods for Determination of Inorganic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A1. 1979. USGS.
9 American National Standard on Photographic Processing Effluents. April 2, 1975. American National Standards Institute.
10 In-Situ Method 1003-8-2009, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) Measurement by Optical Probe. 2009. In-Situ Incorporated.
11 The use of normal and differential pulse voltage ramps to increase sensitivity and resolution is acceptable.
12 Carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD 5) must not be confused with the traditional BOD 5 test method which measures “total 5-day BOD.” The addition of the nitrification inhibitor is not a procedural option but must be included to report the CBOD 5 parameter. A discharger whose permit requires reporting the traditional BOD 5 may not use a nitrification inhibitor in the procedure for reporting the results. Only when a discharger's permit specifically states CBOD 5 is required can the permittee report data using a nitrification inhibitor.
13 OIC Chemical Oxygen Demand Method. 1978. Oceanography International Corporation.
14 Method 8000, Chemical Oxygen Demand, Hach Handbook of Water Analysis, 1979. Hach Company.
15 The back-titration method will be used to resolve controversy.
16 Orion Research Instruction Manual, Residual Chlorine Electrode Model 97-70. 1977. Orion Research Incorporated. The calibration graph for the Orion residual chlorine method must be derived using a reagent blank and three standard solutions, containing 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mL 0.00281 N potassium iodate/100 mL solution, respectively.
17 Method 245.7, Mercury in Water by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, EPA-821-R-05-001. Revision 2.0, February 2005. US EPA.
18 National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI) Technical Bulletin 253 (1971) and Technical Bulletin 803, May 2000.
19 Method 8506, Bicinchoninate Method for Copper, Hach Handbook of Water Analysis. 1979. Hach Company.
20 When using a method with block digestion, this treatment is not required.
21 Industrial Method Number 378-75WA, Hydrogen ion (pH) Automated Electrode Method, Bran & Luebbe (Technicon) Autoanalyzer II. October 1976. Bran & Luebbe Analyzing Technologies.
22 Method 8008, 1,10-Phenanthroline Method using FerroVer Iron Reagent for Water. 1980. Hach Company.
23 Method 8034, Periodate Oxidation Method for Manganese, Hach Handbook of Wastewater Analysis. 1979. Hach Company.
24 Methods for Analysis of Organic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A3, (1972 Revised 1987). 1987. USGS.
25 Method 8507, Nitrogen, Nitrite-Low Range, Diazotization Method for Water and Wastewater. 1979. Hach Company.
26 Just prior to distillation, adjust the sulfuric-acid-preserved sample to pH 4 with 1 + 9 NaOH.
27 The colorimetric reaction must be conducted at a pH of 10.0 ± 0.2.
28 Addison, R.F., and R.G. Ackman. 1970. Direct Determination of Elemental Phosphorus by Gas-Liquid Chromatography, Journal of Chromatograph y, 47(3):421-426.
29 Approved methods for the analysis of silver in industrial wastewaters at concentrations of 1 mg/L and above are inadequate where silver exists as an inorganic halide. Silver halides such as the bromide and chloride are relatively insoluble in reagents such as nitric acid but are readily soluble in an aqueous buffer of sodium thiosulfate and sodium hydroxide to pH of 12. Therefore, for levels of silver above 1 mg/L, 20 mL of sample should be diluted to 100 mL by adding 40 mL each of 2 M Na 2 S 2 O 3 and NaOH. Standards should be prepared in the same manner. For levels of silver below 1 mg/L the approved method is satisfactory.
30 The use of EDTA decreases method sensitivity. Analysts may omit EDTA or replace with another suitable complexing reagent provided that all method-specified quality control acceptance criteria are met.
31 For samples known or suspected to contain high levels of silver ( e.g., in excess of 4 mg/L), cyanogen iodide should be used to keep the silver in solution for analysis. Prepare a cyanogen iodide solution by adding 4.0 mL of concentrated NH 4 OH, 6.5 g of KCN, and 5.0 mL of a 1.0 N solution of I 2 to 50 mL of reagent water in a volumetric flask and dilute to 100.0 mL. After digestion of the sample, adjust the pH of the digestate to <7 to prevent the formation of HCN under acidic conditions. Add 1 mL of the cyanogen iodide solution to the sample digestate and adjust the volume to 100 mL with reagent water (NOT acid). If cyanogen iodide is added to sample digestates, then silver standards must be prepared that contain cyanogen iodide as well. Prepare working standards by diluting a small volume of a silver stock solution with water and adjusting the pH>7 with NH 4 OH. Add 1 mL of the cyanogen iodide solution and let stand 1 hour. Transfer to a 100-mL volumetric flask and dilute to volume with water.
32 “Water Temperature-Influential Factors, Field Measurement and Data Presentation,” Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 1, Chapter D1. 1975. USGS.
33 Method 8009, Zincon Method for Zinc, Hach Handbook of Water Analysis, 1979. Hach Company.
34 Method AES0029, Direct Current Plasma (DCP) Optical Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Elemental Analysis of Water and Wastes. 1986—Revised 1991. Thermo Jarrell Ash Corporation.
35 In-Situ Method 1004-8-2009, Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand (CBOD) Measurement by Optical Probe. 2009. In-Situ Incorporated.
36 Microwave-assisted digestion may be employed for this metal, when analyzed by this methodology. Closed Vessel Microwave Digestion of Wastewater Samples for Determination of Metals. April 16, 1992. CEM Corporation.
37 When determining boron and silica, only plastic, PTFE, or quartz laboratory ware may be used from start until completion of analysis.
38 Only use n -hexane ( n -Hexane—85% minimum purity, 99.0% min. saturated C6 isomers, residue less than 1 mg/L) extraction solvent when determining Oil and Grease parameters—Hexane Extractable Material (HEM), or Silica Gel Treated HEM (analogous to EPA Methods 1664 Rev. A and 1664 Rev. B). Use of other extraction solvents is prohibited.
39 Method PAI-DK01, Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl, Block Digestion, Steam Distillation, Titrimetric Detection. Revised December 22, 1994. OI Analytical.
40 Method PAI-DK02, Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl, Block Digestion, Steam Distillation, Colorimetric Detection. Revised December 22, 1994. OI Analytical.
41 Method PAI-DK03, Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl, Block Digestion, Automated FIA Gas Diffusion. Revised December 22, 1994. OI Analytical.
42 Method 1664 Rev. B is the revised version of EPA Method 1664 Rev. A. U.S. EPA. February 1999, Revision A. Method 1664, n -Hexane Extractable Material (HEM; Oil and Grease) and Silica Gel Treated n -Hexane Extractable Material (SGT-HEM; Non-polar Material) by Extraction and Gravimetry. EPA-821-R-98-002. U.S. EPA. February 2010, Revision B. Method 1664, n -Hexane Extractable Material (HEM; Oil and Grease) and Silica Gel Treated n -Hexane Extractable Material (SGT-HEM; Non-polar Material) by Extraction and Gravimetry. EPA-821-R-10-001.
43 Method 1631, Revision E, Mercury in Water by Oxidation, Purge and Trap, and Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, EPA-821-R-02-019. Revision E. August 2002, U.S. EPA. The application of clean techniques described in EPA's Method 1669: Sampling Ambient Water for Trace Metals at EPA Water Quality Criteria Levels, EPA-821-R-96-011, are recommended to preclude contamination at low-level, trace metal determinations.
44 Method OIA-1677-09, Available Cyanide by Ligand Exchange and Flow Injection Analysis (FIA). 2010. OI Analytical.
45 Open File Report 00-170, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Ammonium Plus Organic Nitrogen by a Kjeldahl Digestion Method and an Automated Photometric Finish that Includes Digest Cleanup by Gas Diffusion. 2000. USGS.
46 Open File Report 93-449, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Chromium in Water by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. 1993. USGS.
47 Open File Report 97-198, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Molybdenum by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. 1997. USGS.
48 Open File Report 92-146, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Total Phosphorus by Kjeldahl Digestion Method and an Automated Colorimetric Finish That Includes Dialysis. 1992. USGS.
49 Open File Report 98-639, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Arsenic and Selenium in Water and Sediment by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. 1999. USGS.
50 Open File Report 98-165, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Elements in Whole-water Digests Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. 1998. USGS.
51 Open File Report 93-125, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Water and Fluvial Sediments. 1993. USGS.
52 Unless otherwise indicated, all EPA methods, excluding EPA Method 300.1, are published in U.S. EPA. May 1994. Methods for the Determination of Metals in Environmental Samples, Supplement I, EPA/600/R-94/111; or U.S. EPA. August 1993. Methods for the Determination of Inorganic Substances in Environmental Samples, EPA/600/R-93/100. EPA Method 300.1 is U.S. EPA. Revision 1.0, 1997, including errata cover sheet April 27, 1999. Determination of Inorganic Ions in Drinking Water by Ion Chromatography.
53 Styrene divinyl benzene beads ( e.g., AMCO-AEPA-1 or equivalent) and stabilized formazin ( e.g., Hach StablCal TM or equivalent) are acceptable substitutes for formazin.
54 Waters Corp. Now included in ASTM D6508-15, Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte. 2015.
55 Kelada-01, Kelada Automated Test Methods for Total Cyanide, Acid Dissociable Cyanide, and Thiocyanate, EPA 821-B-01-009, Revision 1.2, August 2001. US EPA. Note: A 450-W UV lamp may be used in this method instead of the 550-W lamp specified if it provides performance within the quality control (QC) acceptance criteria of the method in a given instrument. Similarly, modified flow cell configurations and flow conditions may be used in the method, provided that the QC acceptance criteria are met.
56 QuikChem Method 10-204-00-1-X, Digestion and Distillation of Total Cyanide in Drinking and Wastewaters using MICRO DIST and Determination of Cyanide by Flow Injection Analysis. Revision 2.2, March 2005. Lachat Instruments.
57 When using sulfide removal test procedures described in EPA Method 335.4, reconstitute particulate that is filtered with the sample prior to distillation.
58 Unless otherwise stated, if the language of this table specifies a sample digestion and/or distillation “followed by” analysis with a method, approved digestion and/or distillation are required prior to analysis.
59 Samples analyzed for available cyanide using OI Analytical method OIA-1677-09 or ASTM method D6888-16 that contain particulate matter may be filtered only after the ligand exchange reagents have been added to the samples, because the ligand exchange process converts complexes containing available cyanide to free cyanide, which is not removed by filtration. Analysts are further cautioned to limit the time between the addition of the ligand exchange reagents and sample filtration to no more than 30 minutes to preclude settling of materials in samples.
60 Analysts should be aware that pH optima and chromophore absorption maxima might differ when phenol is replaced by a substituted phenol as the color reagent in Berthelot Reaction (“phenol-hypochlorite reaction”) colorimetric ammonium determination methods. For example, when phenol is used as the color reagent, pH optimum and wavelength of maximum absorbance are about 11.5 and 635 nm, respectively—see, Patton, C.J. and S.R. Crouch. March 1977. Anal. Chem. 49:464-469. These reaction parameters increase to pH > 12.6 and 665 nm when salicylate is used as the color reagent—see, Krom, M.D. April 1980. The Analyst 105:305-316.
61 If atomic absorption or ICP instrumentation is not available, the aluminon colorimetric method detailed in the 19th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater may be used. This method has poorer precision and bias than the methods of choice.
62 Easy (1-Reagent) Nitrate Method, Revision November 12, 2011. Craig Chinchilla.
63 Hach Method 10360, Luminescence Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen in Water and Wastewater and for Use in the Determination of BOD 5 and CBOD 5 . Revision 1.2, October 2011. Hach Company. This method may be used to measure dissolved oxygen when performing the methods approved in this table IB for measurement of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD).
64 In-Situ Method 1002-8-2009, Dissolved Oxygen (DO) Measurement by Optical Probe. 2009. In-Situ Incorporated.
65 Mitchell Method M5331, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 1.0, July 31, 2008. Leck Mitchell.
66 Mitchell Method M5271, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 1.0, July 31, 2008. Leck Mitchell.
67 Orion Method AQ4500, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 5, March 12, 2009. Thermo Scientific.
68 EPA Method 200.5, Determination of Trace Elements in Drinking Water by Axially Viewed Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry, EPA/600/R-06/115. Revision 4.2, October 2003. US EPA.
69 Method 1627, Kinetic Test Method for the Prediction of Mine Drainage Quality, EPA-821-R-09-002. December 2011. US EPA.
70 Techniques and Methods Book 5-B1, Determination of Elements in Natural-Water, Biota, Sediment and Soil Samples Using Collision/Reaction Cell Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry, Chapter 1, Section B, Methods of the National Water Quality Laboratory, Book 5, Laboratory Analysis, 2006. USGS.
71 Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4132, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Organic Plus Inorganic Mercury in Filtered and Unfiltered Natural Water with Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, 2001. USGS.
72 USGS Techniques and Methods 5-B8, Chapter 8, Section B, Methods of the National Water Quality Laboratory Book 5, Laboratory Analysis, 2011 USGS.
73 NECi Method N07-0003, “Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis,” Revision 9.0, March 2014, The Nitrate Elimination Co., Inc.
74 Timberline Instruments, LLC Method Ammonia-001, “Determination of Inorganic Ammonia by Continuous Flow Gas Diffusion and Conductivity Cell Analysis,” June 2011, Timberline Instruments, LLC.
75 Hach Company Method 10206, “Spectrophotometric Measurement of Nitrate in Water and Wastewater,” Revision 2.1, January 2013, Hach Company.
76 Hach Company Method 10242, “Simplified Spectrophotometric Measurement of Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen in Water and Wastewater,” Revision 1.1, January 2013, Hach Company.
77 National Council for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI) Method TNTP-W10900, “Total (Kjeldahl) Nitrogen and Total Phosphorus in Pulp and Paper Biologically Treated Effluent by Alkaline Persulfate Digestion,” June 2011, National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc.
78 The pH adjusted sample is to be adjusted to 7.6 for NPDES reporting purposes.
79 I-2057-85 in U.S. Geological Survey Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 5, Chap. A1, Methods for Determination of Inorganic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, 1989.
80 Methods I-2522-90, I-2540-90, and I-2601-90 in U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 93-125, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Water and Fluvial Sediments, 1993.
81 Method I-4472-97 in U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 98-165, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Water and Fluvial Sediments, 1998.
82 FIAlab 100, “Determination of Inorganic Ammonia by Continuous Flow Gas Diffusion and Fluorescence Detector Analysis”, April 4, 2018, FIAlab Instruments, Inc.
83 MACHEREY-NAGEL GmbH and Co. Method 036/038 NANOCOLOR® COD LR/HR, “Spectrophotometric Measurement of Chemical Oxygen Demand in Water and Wastewater”, Revision 1.5, May 2018, MACHEREY-NAGEL GmbH and Co. KG.
84 Please refer to the following applicable Quality Control Sections: Part 2000 Methods, Physical and Aggregate Properties 2020 (2021); Part 3000 Methods, Metals, 3020 (2021); Part 4000 Methods, Inorganic Nonmetallic Constituents, 4020 (2022); Part 5000 Methods, and Aggregate Organic Constituents, 5020 (2022). These Quality Control Standards are available for download at www.standardmethods.org at no charge.
85 Each laboratory may establish its own control limits by performing at least 25 glucose-glutamic acid (GGA) checks over several weeks or months and calculating the mean and standard deviation. The laboratory may then use the mean ± 3 standard deviations as the control limit for future GGA checks. However, GGA acceptance criteria can be no wider than 198 ± 30.5 mg/L for BOD 5 . GGA acceptance criteria for CBOD must be either 198 ± 30.5 mg/L, or the lab may develop control charts under the following conditions: dissolved oxygen uptake from the seed contribution is between 0.6-1.0 mg/L; control charts are performed on at least 25 GGA checks with three standard deviations from the derived mean; the RSD must not exceed 7.5%; and any single GGA value cannot be less than 150 mg/L or higher than 250 mg/L.
86 The approved method is that cited in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 14th Edition, 1976.
1. Acidity (as CaCO 3), mg/LElectrometric endpoint or phenolphthalein endpoint2310 B-2020D1067-16I-1020-85. 2
2. Alkalinity (as CaCO 3), mg/LElectrometric or Colorimetric titration to pH 4.5, Manual2320 B-2021D1067-16973.43, 3 I-1030-85. 2
Automatic310.2 (Rev. 1974) 1I-2030-85. 2
3. Aluminum—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 D-2019 or 3111 E-2019I-3051-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020.
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97, 81
Direct Current Plasma (DCP) 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (Eriochrome cyanine R)3500-Al B-2020.
4. Ammonia (as N), mg/LManual distillation 6 or gas diffusion (pH > 11), followed by any of the following:350.1 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-NH 3 B-2021973.49. 3
NesslerizationD1426-15 (A)973.49, 3 I-3520-85. 2
Titration4500-NH 3 C-2021.
Electrode4500-NH 3 D-2021 or E-2021D1426-15 (B)
Manual phenate, salicylate, or other substituted phenols in Berthelot reaction-based methods4500-NH 3 F-2021See footnote. 60
Automated phenate, salicylate, or other substituted phenols in Berthelot reaction-based methods350.1, 30 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-NH 3 G-2021, 4500-NH 3 H-2021I-4523-85, 2 I-2522-90. 80
Automated electrodeSee footnote. 7
Ion ChromatographyD6919-17.
Automated gas diffusion, followed by conductivity cell analysisTimberline Ammonia-001. 74
Automated gas diffusion followed by fluorescence detector analysisFIAlab100. 82
5. Antimony—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019.
AA furnace3113 B-2020.
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20.
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
6. Arsenic—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:206.5 (Issued 1978). 1
AA gaseous hydride3114 B-2020 or 3114 C-2020D2972-15 (B)I-3062-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D2972-15 (C)I-4063-98. 49
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5, Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20.
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05. 70
Colorimetric (SDDC)3500-As B-2020D2972-15 (A)I-3060-85. 2
7. Barium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 D-2019I-3084-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D4382-18.
ICP/AES 36200.5, Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36See footnote. 34
8. Beryllium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 D-2019 or 3111 E-2019D3645-15 (A)I-3095-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D3645-15 (B).
STGFAA200.9, Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCPD4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (aluminon)See footnote 61
9. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5), mg/LDissolved Oxygen Depletion5210 B-2016 85973.44 3 p. 17, 9 I-1578-78, 8 see footnote. 1063
10. Boron—Total, 37 mg/LColorimetric (curcumin)4500-B B-2011I-3112-85. 2
ICP/AES200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCPD4190-15See footnote. 34
11. Bromide, mg/LElectrodeD1246-16I-1125-85. 2
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev 2.1 (1993), and 300.1 Rev 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020, C-2020 or D-2020D4327-17993.30, 3 I-2057-85. 79
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508 Rev. 2. 54
12. Cadmium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D3557-17 (A or B)974.27 3 p. 37, 9 I-3135-85 2 or I-3136-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D3557-17 (D)I-4138-89. 51
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-1472-85 2 or I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Voltammetry 11D3557-17 (C).
Colorimetric (Dithizone)3500-Cd D-1990.
13. Calcium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019 or 3111 D-2019D511-14 (B)I-3152-85. 2
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCPSee footnote. 34
Titrimetric (EDTA)3500-Ca B-2020D511-14 (A).
Ion ChromatographyD6919-17.
14. Carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD 5), mg/L 12Dissolved Oxygen Depletion with nitrification inhibitor5210 B-2016 85See footnotes. 35 63
15. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), mg/LTitrimetric410.3 (Rev. 1978) 15220 B-2011 or C-2011D1252-06(12) (A)973.46 3 p. 17, 9 I-3560-85. 2
Spectrophotometric, manual or automatic410.4 Rev. 2.0 (1993)5220 D-2011D1252-06(12) (B)See footnotes, 131483 I-3561-85. 2
16. Chloride, mg/LTitrimetric: (silver nitrate)4500-Cl B-2021D512-12 (B)I-1183-85. 2
(Mercuric nitrate)4500-Cl C-2021D512-12 (A)973.51, 3 I-1184-85. 2
Colorimetric: manualI-1187-85. 2
Automated (ferricyanide)4500-Cl E-2021I-2187-85. 2
Potentiometric Titration4500-Cl D-2021.
Ion Selective ElectrodeD512-12 (C).
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev 2.1 (1993), and 300.1 Rev 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or 4110 C-2020D4327-17993.30, 3 I-2057-90. 51
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508, Rev. 2. 54
17. Chlorine—Total residual, mg/LAmperometric direct4500-Cl D-2011D1253-14.
Amperometric direct (low level)4500-Cl E-2011.
Iodometric direct4500-Cl B-2011.
Back titration ether end-point 154500-Cl C-2011.
DPD-FAS4500-Cl F-2011.
Spectrophotometric, DPD4500-Cl G-2011.
ElectrodeSee footnote. 16
17A. Chlorine—Free Available, mg/LAmperometric direct4500-Cl D-2011D1253-14.
Amperometric direct (low level)4500-Cl E-2011.
DPD-FAS4500-Cl F-2011.
Spectrophotometric, DPD4500-Cl G-2011.
18. Chromium VI dissolved, mg/L0.45-micron filtration followed by any of the following:
AA chelation-extraction3111 C-2019I-1232-85. 2
Colorimetric (diphenyl-carbazide)3500-Cr B-2020D1687-17 (A)I-1230-85. 2
19. Chromium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019D1687-17 (B)974.27, 3 I-3236-85. 2
AA chelation-extraction3111 C-2019.
AA furnace3113 B-2020D1687-17 (C)I-3233-93. 46
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20.
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05 70 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (diphenyl-carbazide)3500-Cr B-2020.
20. Cobalt—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D3558-15 (A or B)p. 37, 9 I-323985. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D3558-15 (C)I-4243-89. 51
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05 70 I-4472-97. 81
DCPD4190-15See footnote. 34
21. Color, platinum cobalt units or dominant wavelength, hue, luminance purityColorimetric (ADMI)2120 F-2021. 78
Platinum cobalt visual comparison2120 B-2021I-1250-85. 2
SpectrophotometricSee footnote. 18
22. Copper—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D1688-17 (A or B)974.27, 3 p. 37, 9 I-3270-85 2 or I-3271-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D1688-17 (C)I-4274-89. 51
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05, 70 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (Neocuproine)3500-Cu B-2020.
Colorimetric (Bathocuproine)3500-Cu C-2020See footnote. 19
23. Cyanide—Total, mg/LAutomated UV digestion/distillation and ColorimetryKelada-01. 55
Segmented Flow Injection, In-Line Ultraviolet Digestion, followed by gas diffusion amperometry4500-CN P-2021D7511-12 (17).
Manual distillation with MgCl 2 , followed by any of the following:335.4 Rev. 1.0 (1993) 574500-CN B-2021 and C-2021D2036-09(15)(A), D7284-2010-204-00-1-X. 56
Flow Injection, gas diffusion amperometryD2036-09(15)(A) D7284-20.
Titrimetric4500-CN D-2021D2036-09(15)(A)See footnote 9 p. 22.
Spectrophotometric, manual4500-CN E-2021D2036-09(15)(A)I-3300-85. 2
Semi-Automated 20335.4 Rev. 1.0 (1993) 574500-CN N-202110-204-00-1-X, 56 I-4302-85. 2
Ion ChromatographyD2036-09(15)(A).
Ion Selective Electrode4500-CN F-2021D2036-09(15)(A).
24. Cyanide—Available, mg/LCyanide Amenable to Chlorination (CATC); Manual distillation with MgCl 2 , followed by Titrimetric or Spectrophotometric4500-CN G-2021D2036-09(15)(B).
Flow injection and ligand exchange, followed by gas diffusion amperometry 594500-CN Q-2021D6888-16OIA-1677-09. 44
Automated Distillation and Colorimetry (no UV digestion)Kelada-01. 55
24A. Cyanide—Free, mg/LFlow Injection, followed by gas diffusion amperometry4500-CN R-2021D7237-18 (A)OIA-1677-09. 44
Manual micro-diffusion and colorimetryD4282-15.
25. Fluoride—Total, mg/LManual distillation, 6 followed by any of the following:4500-F B-2021D1179-16 (A).
Electrode, manual4500-F C-2021D1179-16 (B).
Electrode, automated4500-F G-2021I-4327-85. 2
Colorimetric, (SPADNS)4500-F D-2021.
Automated complexone4500-F E-2021.
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev 2.1 (1993) and 300.1 Rev 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or C-2020D4327-17993.30. 3
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508, Rev. 2. 54
26. Gold—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019.
AA furnace231.2 (Issued 1978) 13113 B-2020.
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCPSee footnote. 34
27. Hardness—Total (as CaCO (3) , mg/LAutomated colorimetric130.1 (Issued 1971). 1
Titrimetric (EDTA)2340 C-2021D1126-17973.52B, 3 I-1338-85. 2
Ca plus Mg as their carbonates, by any approved method for Ca and Mg (See Parameters 13 and 33), provided that the sum of the lowest point of quantitation for Ca and Mg is below the NPDES permit requirement for Hardness.2340 B-2021.
28. Hydrogen ion (pH), pH unitsElectrometric measurement4500-H + B-2021D1293-18 (A or B)973.41, 3 I-1586-85. 2
Automated electrode150.2 (Dec. 1982) 1See footnote 21 I-2587-85. 2
29. Iridium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019.
AA furnace235.2 (Issued 1978). 1
ICP/MS3125 B-2020.
30. Iron—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D1068-15 (A)974.27, 3 I-3381-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D1068-15 (B).
STGFAA200.9, Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (Phenanthroline)3500-Fe B-2011D1068-15 (C)See footnote. 22
31. Kjeldahl Nitrogen 5 —Total (as N), mg/LManual digestion 20 and distillation or gas diffusion, followed by any of the following:4500-N org B-2021 or C-2021 and 4500-NH 3 B-2021D3590-17 (A)I-4515-91. 45
Titration4500-NH 3 C-2021973.48. 3
NesslerizationD1426-15 (A).
Electrode4500-NH 3 D-2021 or E-2021D1426-15 (B).
Semi-automated phenate350.1 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-NH 3 G-2021 or 4500-NH 3 H-2021.
Manual phenate, salicylate, or other substituted phenols in Berthelot reaction based methods4500-NH 3 F-2021See footnote. 60
Automated gas diffusion, followed by conductivity cell analysisTimberline Ammonia-001. 74
Automated gas diffusion followed by fluorescence detector analysisFIAlab 100. 82
Automated Methods for TKN that do not require manual distillation.
Automated phenate, salicylate, or other substituted phenols in Berthelot reaction-based methods colorimetric (auto digestion and distillation)351.1 (Rev. 1978) 1I-4551-78. 8
Semi-automated block digestor colorimetric (distillation not required)351.2 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-N org D-2021D3590-17 (B)I-4515-91. 45
Block digester, followed by Auto distillation and TitrationSee footnote. 39
Block digester, followed by Auto distillation and NesslerizationSee footnote. 40
Block Digester, followed by Flow injection gas diffusion (distillation not required)See footnote. 41
Digestion with peroxdisulfate, followed by Spectrophotometric (2,6-dimethyl phenol)Hach 10242. 76
Digestion with persulfate, followed by ColorimetricNCASI TNTP W10900. 77
32. Lead—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D3559-15 (A or B)974.27, 3 I-3399-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D3559-15 (D)I-4403-89. 51
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Voltammetry 11D3559-15 (C).
Colorimetric (Dithizone)3500-Pb B-2020.
33. Magnesium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019D511-14 (B)974.27, 3 I-3447-85. 2
ICP/AES200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCPSee footnote. 34
Ion ChromatographyD6919-17.
34. Manganese—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D858-17 (A or B)974.27, 3 I-3454-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D858-17 (C).
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5, Rev. 4.2 (2003); 68 200.7, Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (Persulfate)3500-Mn B-2020920.203. 3
Colorimetric (Periodate)See footnote. 23
35. Mercury—Total, mg/LCold vapor, Manual245.1 Rev. 3.0 (1994)3112 B-2020D3223-17977.22, 3 I-3462-85. 2
Cold vapor, Automated245.2 (Issued 1974). 1
Cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS)245.7 Rev. 2.0 (2005) 17I-4464-01. 71
Purge and Trap CVAFS1631E. 43
36. Molybdenum—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 D-2019I-3490-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020I-3492-96. 47
ICP/AES200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCPSee footnote. 34
37. Nickel—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D1886-14 (A or B)I-3499-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020D1886-14 (C)I-4503-89. 51
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05, 70 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
38. Nitrate (as N), mg/LIon Chromatography300.0 Rev. 2.1 (1993) and 300.1 Rev. 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or C-2020D4327-17993.30. 3
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508, Rev. 2. 54
Ion Selective Electrode4500-NO 3 D-2019.
Colorimetric (Brucine sulfate)352.1 (Issued 1971) 1973.50, 3 419D, 86 p. 28. 9
Spectrophotometric (2,6-dimethylphenol)Hach 10206. 75
Nitrate-nitrite N minus Nitrite N (see parameters 39 and 40).
39. Nitrate-nitrite (as N), mg/LCadmium reduction, Manual4500-NO 3 E-2019D3867-16 (B).
Cadmium reduction, Automated353.2 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-NO 3 F-2019 or 4500-NO 3 I-2019D3867-16 (A)I-2545-90. 51
Automated hydrazine4500-NO 3 H-2019.
Reduction/ColorimetricSee footnote. 62
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev. 2.1 (1993) and 300.1 Rev. 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or C-2020D4327-17993.30. 3
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508, Rev. 2. 54
Enzymatic reduction, followed by automated colorimetric determinationD7781-14I-2547-11, 72 I-2548-11, 72 N07-0003. 73
Enzymatic reduction, followed by manual colorimetric determination4500-NO 3 J-2018.
Spectrophotometric (2,6-dimethylphenol)Hach 10206. 75
40. Nitrite (as N), mg/LSpectrophotometric: Manual4500-NO 2 B-2021See footnote. 25
Automated (Diazotization)I-4540-85 2 see footnote, 62 I-2540-90. 80
Automated (*bypass cadmium reduction)353.2 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-NO 3 F-2019, 4500-NO 3 I-2019D3867-16 (A)I-4545-85. 2
Manual (*bypass cadmium or enzymatic reduction)4500-NO 3 E-2019, 4500-NO 3 J-2018D3867-16 (B).
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev. 2.1 (1993) and 300.1 Rev. 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or C-2020D4327-17993.30. 3
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508, Rev. 2. 54
Automated (*bypass Enzymatic reduction)D7781-14I-2547-11, 72 I-2548-11, 72 N07-0003. 73
41. Oil and grease—Total recoverable, mg/LHexane extractable material (HEM): n -Hexane extraction and gravimetry1664 Rev. A 1664 Rev. B 425520 B or G-2021. 38
Silica gel treated HEM (SGT-HEM): Silica gel treatment and gravimetry1664 Rev. A, 1664 Rev. B 425520 B or G-2021 38 and 5520 F-2021. 38
42. Organic carbon—Total (TOC), mg/LCombustion5310 B-2014D7573-18a e1973.47, 3 p. 14. 24
Heated persulfate or UV persulfate oxidation5310 C-2014, 5310 D-2011D4839-03(17)973.47, 3, p. 14. 24
43. Organic nitrogen (as N), mg/LTotal Kjeldahl N (Parameter 31) minus ammonia N (Parameter 4).
44. Ortho-phosphate (as P), mg/LAscorbic acid method:
Automated365.1 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-P F-2021 or G-2021973.56, 3 I-4601-85, 2 I-2601-90. 80
Manual, single-reagent4500-P E-2021D515-88 (A)973.55. 3
Manual, two-reagent365.3 (Issued 1978). 1
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev. 2.1 (1993) and 300.1 Rev. 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or C-2020D4327-17993.30. 3
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508, Rev. 2. 54
45. Osmium—Total 4 , mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 D-2019.
AA furnace252.2 (Issued 1978). 1
46. Oxygen, dissolved, mg/LWinkler (Azide modification)4500-O (B-F)-2021D888-18 (A)973.45B, 3 I-1575-78. 8
Electrode4500-O G-2021D888-18 (B)I-1576-78. 8
Luminescence-Based Sensor4500-O H-2021D888-18 (C)See footnotes.
47. Palladium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019.
AA furnace253.2 (Issued 1978). 1
ICP/MS3125 B-2020.
DCPSee footnote. 34
48. Phenols, mg/LManual distillation, 26 followed by any of the following:420.1 (Rev. 1978) 15530 B-2021D1783-01(12)
Colorimetric (4AAP) manual420.1 (Rev. 1978) 15530 D-2021 27D1783-01(12) (A or B).
Automated colorimetric (4AAP)420.4 Rev. 1.0 (1993).
49. Phosphorus (elemental), mg/LGas-liquid chromatographySee footnote. 28
50. Phosphorus—Total, mg/LDigestion, 20 followed by any of the following:4500-P B (5)-2021973.55. 3
Manual365.3 (Issued 1978) 14500-P E-2021D515-88 (A).
Automated ascorbic acid reduction365.1 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-P (F-H)-2021973.56, 3 I-4600-85. 2
ICP/AES 436200.7Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020I-4471-97. 50
Semi-automated block digestor (TKP digestion)365.4 (Issued 1974) 1D515-88 (B)I-4610-91. 48
Digestion with persulfate, followed by ColorimetricNCASI TNTP W10900. 77
51. Platinum—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019.
AA furnace255.2 (Issued 1978). 1
ICP/MS3125 B-2020.
DCPSee footnote. 34
52. Potassium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019973.5, 3 I-3630-85. 2
ICP/AES200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020.
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
Flame photometric3500-K B-2020.
Electrode3500-K C-2020.
Ion ChromatographyD6919-17.
53. Residue—Total, mg/LGravimetric, 103-105°2540 B-2020I-3750-85. 2
54. Residue—filterable, mg/LGravimetric, 180°2540 C-2020D5907-18 (B)I-1750-85. 2
55. Residue—non-filterable (TSS), mg/LGravimetric, 103-105° post-washing of residue2540 D-2020D5907-18 (A)I-3765-85. 2
56. Residue—settleable, mg/LVolumetric (Imhoff cone), or gravimetric2540 F-2020.
57. Residue—Volatile, mg/LGravimetric, 550°160.4 (Issued 1971) 12540 E-2020I-3753-85. 2
58. Rhodium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration, or3111 B-2019.
AA furnace265.2 (Issued 1978). 1
ICP/MS3125 B-2020.
59. Ruthenium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration, or3111 B-2019.
AA furnace267.2. 1
ICP/MS3125 B-2020.
60. Selenium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA furnace3113 B-2020D3859-15 (B)I-4668-98. 49
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20.
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05 70 I-4472-97. 81
AA gaseous hydride3114 B-2020, or 3114 C-2020D3859-15 (A)I-3667-85. 2
61. Silica—Dissolved, 37 mg/L0.45-micron filtration followed by any of the following:
Colorimetric, Manual4500-SiO 2 C-2021D859-16I-1700-85. 2
Automated (Molybdosilicate)4500-SiO 2 E-2021 or F-2021I-2700-85. 2
ICP/AES200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
62. Silver—Total, 4 31 mg/LDigestion, 4 29 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019974.27, 3 p. 37, 9 I-3720-85. 2
AA furnace3113 B-2020I-4724-89. 51
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4472-97. 81
DCPSee footnote. 34
63. Sodium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019973.54, 3 I-3735-85. 2
ICP/AES200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCPSee footnote. 34
Flame photometric3500-Na B-2020.
Ion ChromatographyD6919-17.
64. Specific conductance, micromhos/cm at 25 °CWheatstone bridge120.1 (Rev. 1982) 12510 B-2021D1125-95(99) (A)973.40, 3 I-2781-85. 2
65. Sulfate (as SO 4), mg/LAutomated colorimetric375.2 Rev. 2.0 (1993)4500-SO 42 F-2021 or G-2021.
Gravimetric4500-SO 42 C-2021 or D-2021925.54. 3
Turbidimetric4500-SO 42 E-2021D516-16.
Ion Chromatography300.0 Rev. 2.1 (1993) and 300.1 Rev. 1.0 (1997)4110 B-2020 or C-2020D4327-17993.30, 3 I-4020-05. 70
CIE/UV4140 B-2020D6508-15D6508 Rev. 2. 54
66. Sulfide (as S), mg/LSample Pretreatment4500-S 2 B, C-2021.
Titrimetric (iodine)4500-S 2 F-2021I-3840-85. 2
Colorimetric (methylene blue)4500-S 2 D-2021.
Ion Selective Electrode4500-S 2 G-2021D4658-15.
67. Sulfite (as SO 3), mg/LTitrimetric (iodine-iodate)4500-SO 32 B-2021.
68. Surfactants, mg/LColorimetric (methylene blue)5540 C-2021D2330-20.
69. Temperature, °CThermometric2550 B-2010See footnote. 32
70. Thallium-Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019.
AA furnace279.2 (Issued 1978) 13113 B-2020.
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20.
ICP/MS200.8, Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4471-97 50 I-4472-97. 81
71. Tin—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 B-2019I-3850-78. 8
AA furnace3113 B-2020.
STGFAA200.9 Rev. 2.2 (1994).
ICP/AES200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994).
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
72. Titanium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 D-2019.
AA furnace283.2 (Issued 1978). 1
ICP/AES200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994).
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14. 3
DCPSee footnote. 34
73. Turbidity, NTU 53Nephelometric180.1, Rev. 2.0 (1993)2130 B-2020D1889-00I-3860-85, 2 see footnotes. 656667
74. Vanadium—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration3111 D-2019.
AA furnace3113 B-2020D3373-17.
ICP/AES200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7 Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05. 70
DCPD4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (Gallic Acid)3500-V B-2011.
75. Zinc—Total, 4 mg/LDigestion, 4 followed by any of the following:
AA direct aspiration 363111 B-2019 or 3111 C-2019D1691-17 (A or B)974.27 3 p. 37, 9 I-3900-85. 2
AA furnace289.2 (Issued 1978). 1
ICP/AES 36200.5 Rev. 4.2 (2003), 68 200.7, Rev. 4.4 (1994)3120 B-2020D1976-20I-4471-97. 50
ICP/MS200.8 Rev. 5.4 (1994)3125 B-2020D5673-16993.14, 3 I-4020-05, 70 I-4472-97. 81
DCP 36D4190-15See footnote. 34
Colorimetric (Zincon)3500 Zn B-2020See footnote. 33
76. Acid Mine Drainage1627. 69

Table IC—List of Approved Test Procedures for Non-Pesticide Organic Compounds
Parameter 1MethodEPA 27Standard methods 17ASTMOther
1. AcenaphtheneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
2. AcenaphthyleneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
3. AcroleinGC603
GC/MS624.1 4 , 1624B.
4. AcrylonitrileGC603
GC/MS624.1 4 , 1624BO-4127-96. 13
5. AnthraceneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
6. BenzeneGC6026200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
7. BenzidineSpectro-photometricSee footnote 3 p.1.
GC/MS625.1 5 , 1625B6410 B-2020.
HPLC605
8. Benzo(a)anthraceneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
9. Benzo(a)pyreneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
10. Benzo(b)fluorantheneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
11. Benzo(g,h,i)peryleneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
12. Benzo(k)fluorantheneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
13. Benzyl chlorideGCSee footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MSSee footnote 6 p. S102.
14. Butyl benzyl phthalateGC606
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
15. bis(2-Chloroethoxy) methaneGC611
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
16. bis(2-Chloroethyl) etherGC611
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
17. bis(2-Ethylhexyl) phthalateGC606
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
18. BromodichloromethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
19. BromoformGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
20. BromomethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
21. 4-Bromophenyl phenyl etherGC611
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
22. Carbon tetrachlorideGC6016200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
23. 4-Chloro-3-methyl phenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
24. ChlorobenzeneGC601, 6026200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 O-4436-16. 14
25. ChloroethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96. 13
26. 2-Chloroethylvinyl etherGC601
GC/MS624.1, 1624B.
27. ChloroformGC6016200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
28. ChloromethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
29. 2-ChloronaphthaleneGC612
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
30. 2-ChlorophenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
31. 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl etherGC611
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
32. ChryseneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
33. Dibenzo(a,h)anthraceneGC610
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
34. DibromochloromethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
35. 1,2-DichlorobenzeneGC601, 6026200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1625B6200 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27, O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
36. 1,3-DichlorobenzeneGC601, 6026200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1625B6200 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27, O-4127-96. 13
37. 1,4-DichlorobenzeneGC601, 6026200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1625B6200 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27, O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
38. 3,3′-DichlorobenzidineGC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020.
HPLC605.
39. DichlorodifluoromethaneGC601.
GC/MS6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
40. 1,1-DichloroethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
41. 1,2-DichloroethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
42. 1,1-DichloroetheneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
43. trans -1,2-DichloroetheneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
44. 2,4-DichlorophenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
45. 1,2-DichloropropaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 O-4436-16. 14
46. cis -1,3-DichloropropeneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
47. trans -1,3-DichloropropeneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
48. Diethyl phthalateGC606.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
49. 2,4-DimethylphenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
50. Dimethyl phthalateGC606.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
51. Di- n -butyl phthalateGC606.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
52. Di- n -octyl phthalateGC606.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
53. 2, 4-DinitrophenolGC6046420 B-2021See footnote 9 p. 27.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020.
54. 2,4-DinitrotolueneGC609.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
55. 2,6-DinitrotolueneGC609.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
56. EpichlorohydrinGCSee footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MSSee footnote 6 p. S102.
57. EthylbenzeneGC6026200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
58. FluorantheneGC610.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
59. FluoreneGC610.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
60. 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
61. 1,2,3,4,7,8,9-Heptachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
62. 1,2,3,4,6,7,8- Heptachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
63. HexachlorobenzeneGC612.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
64. HexachlorobutadieneGC612.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27, O-4127-96. 13
65. HexachlorocyclopentadieneGC612.
GC/MS625.1 5 , 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 , p. 27, O-4127-96. 13
66. 1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
67. 1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
68. 1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
69. 2,3,4,6,7,8-Hexachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
70. 1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
71. 1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
72. 1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
73. HexachloroethaneGC612.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27, O-4127-96. 13
74. Indeno(1,2,3-c,d) pyreneGC610.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
75. IsophoroneGC609.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
76. Methylene chlorideGC6016200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
77. 2-Methyl-4,6-dinitrophenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
78. NaphthaleneGC610.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021.
79. NitrobenzeneGC609.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLCD4657-92 (98).
80. 2-NitrophenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
81. 4-NitrophenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
82. N-NitrosodimethylamineGC607.
GC/MS625.1 5 , 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
83. N-Nitrosodi- n -propylamineGC607.
GC/MS625.1 5 , 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
84. N-NitrosodiphenylamineGC607.
GC/MS625.1 5 , 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
85. OctachlorodibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
86. Octachlorodibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
87. 2,2′-oxybis(1-chloropropane) 12 [also known as bis(2-Chloro-1-methylethyl) ether]GC611.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
88. PCB-1016GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
89. PCB-1221GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
90. PCB-1232GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
91. PCB-1242GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
92. PCB-1248GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
93. PCB-1254GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
94. PCB-1260GC608.3See footnote 3 p. 43, see footnote. 8
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
95. 1,2,3,7,8-Pentachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
96. 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
97. 1,2,3,7,8-Pentachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
98. PentachlorophenolGC6046420 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 140.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
99. PhenanthreneGC610.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
100. PhenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
101. PyreneGC610.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
HPLC6106440 B-2021D4657-92 (98).
102. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro-dibenzofuranGC/MS1613B 10SGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
103. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxinGC/MS613, 625.1 5 , 1613BSGS AXYS 16130 15 , PAM 16130-SSI. 16
104. 1,1,2,2-TetrachloroethaneGC6016200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96. 13
105. TetrachloroetheneGC6016200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
106. TolueneGC6026200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
107. 1,2,4-TrichlorobenzeneGC612See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27, O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
108. 1,1,1-TrichloroethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
109. 1,1,2-TrichloroethaneGC6016200 C-2020See footnote 3 p. 130.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
110. TrichloroetheneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
111. TrichlorofluoromethaneGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.16200 B-2020O-4127-96. 13
112. 2,4,6-TrichlorophenolGC6046420 B-2021.
GC/MS625.1, 1625B6410 B-2020See footnote 9 p. 27.
113. Vinyl chlorideGC6016200 C-2020.
GC/MS624.1, 1624B6200 B-2020O-4127-96 13 , O-4436-16. 14
114. NonylphenolGC/MSD7065-17.
115. Bisphenol A (BPA)GC/MSD7065-17.
116. p-tert -Octylphenol (OP)GC/MSD7065-17.
117. Nonylphenol Monoethoxylate (NP1EO)GC/MSD7065-17.
118. Nonylphenol Diethoxylate (NP2EO)GC/MSD7065-17.
119. Adsorbable Organic Halides (AOX)Adsorption and Coulometric Titration1650. 11
120. Chlorinated PhenolicsIn Situ Acetylation and GC/MS1653. 11
Table IC notes:

1 All parameters are expressed in micrograms per liter (µg/L) except for Method 1613B, in which the parameters are expressed in picograms per liter (pg/L).
2 The full text of Methods 601-613, 1613B, 1624B, and 1625B are provided at appendix A, Test Procedures for Analysis of Organic Pollutants. The standardized test procedure to be used to determine the method detection limit (MDL) for these test procedures is given at appendix B of this part, Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit. These methods are available at: https://www.epa.gov/cwa-methods as individual PDF files.
3 Methods for Benzidine: Chlorinated Organic Compounds, Pentachlorophenol and Pesticides in Water and Wastewater. September 1978. U.S. EPA.
4 Method 624.1 may be used for quantitative determination of acrolein and acrylonitrile, provided that the laboratory has documentation to substantiate the ability to detect and quantify these analytes at levels necessary to comply with any associated regulations. In addition, the use of sample introduction techniques other than simple purge-and-trap may be required. QC acceptance criteria from Method 603 should be used when analyzing samples for acrolein and acrylonitrile in the absence of such criteria in Method 624.1.
5 Method 625.1 may be extended to include benzidine, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosodi- n -propylamine, and N-nitrosodiphenylamine. However, when they are known to be present, Methods 605, 607, and 612, or Method 1625B, are preferred methods for these compounds. Method 625.1 may be applied to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro-dibenzo- p -dioxin for screening purposes only.
6 Selected Analytical Methods Approved and Cited by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Supplement to the 15th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 1981. American Public Health Association (APHA).
7 Each analyst must make an initial, one-time demonstration of their ability to generate acceptable precision and accuracy with Methods 601-603, 1624B, and 1625B in accordance with procedures in Section 8.2 of each of these methods. Additionally, each laboratory, on an on-going basis must spike and analyze 10% (5% for Methods 624.1 and 625.1 and 100% for methods 1624B and 1625B) of all samples to monitor and evaluate laboratory data quality in accordance with Sections 8.3 and 8.4 of these methods. When the recovery of any parameter falls outside the quality control (QC) acceptance criteria in the pertinent method, analytical results for that parameter in the unspiked sample are suspect. The results should be reported but cannot be used to demonstrate regulatory compliance. If the method does not contain QC acceptance criteria, control limits of ±three standard deviations around the mean of a minimum of five replicate measurements must be used. These quality control requirements also apply to the Standard Methods, ASTM Methods, and other methods cited.
8 Organochlorine Pesticides and PCBs in Wastewater Using Empore TM Disk. Revised October 28, 1994. 3M Corporation.
9 Method O-3116-87 is in Open File Report 93-125, Methods of Analysis by U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Water and Fluvial Sediments. 1993. USGS.
10 Analysts may use Fluid Management Systems, Inc. Power-Prep system in place of manual cleanup provided the analyst meets the requirements of Method 1613B (as specified in Section 9 of the method) and permitting authorities. Method 1613, Revision B, Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dioxins and Furans by Isotope Dilution HRGC/HRMS. Revision B, 1994. U.S. EPA. The full text of this method is provided in appendix A to this part and at https://www.epa.gov/cwa-methods/approved-cwa-test-methods-organic-compounds.
11 Method 1650, Adsorbable Organic Halides by Adsorption and Coulometric Titration. Revision C, 1997 U.S. EPA. Method 1653, Chlorinated Phenolics in Wastewater by In Situ Acetylation and GCMS. Revision A, 1997 U.S. EPA. The full text for both of these methods is provided at appendix A in part 430 of this chapter, The Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Point Source Category.
12 The compound was formerly inaccurately labeled as 2,2′-oxybis(2-chloropropane) and bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether. Some versions of Methods 611, and 1625 inaccurately list the analyte as “bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether,” but use the correct CAS number of 108-60-1.
13 Method O-4127-96, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 97-829, Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of 86 volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, including detections less than reporting limits,1998, USGS.
14 Method O-4436-16 U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, book 5, chap. B12, Determination of heat purgeable and ambient purgeable volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, 2016, USGS.
15 SGS AXYS Method 16130, “Determination of 2,3,7,8-Substituted Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dibenzo- p -Dioxins and Dibenzofurans (CDDs/CDFs) Using Waters and Agilent Gas Chromatography-Tandem-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS/MS), Revision 1.0” is available at: https://www.sgsaxys.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/SGS-AXYS-Method-16130-Rev-1.0.pdf.
16 Pace Analytical Method PAM-16130-SSI, “Determination of 2,3,7,8-Substituted Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dibenzo- p -Dioxins and Dibenzofurans (CDDs/CDFs) Using Shimadzu Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), Revision 1.1,” is available at: pacelabs.com.
17 Please refer to the following applicable Quality Control Section: Part 6000 Individual Organic Compounds, 6020 (2019). The Quality Control Standards are available for download at standardmethods.org at no charge.

Table ID—List of Approved Test Procedures for Pesticides 1
ParameterMethodEPAStandard methods 15ASTMOther
1. AldrinGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96 (02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
2. AmetrynGC507, 619See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 9 O-3106-93, see footnote 6 p. S68.
GC/MS525.2, 625.1See footnote 14 O-1121-91.
3. AminocarbTLCSee footnote 3 p. 94, see footnote 6 p. S60.
HPLC632.
4. AtratonGC619See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68.
GC/MS625.1.
5. AtrazineGC507, 619, 608.3See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68, see footnote 9 O-3106-93.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
6. Azinphos methylGC614, 622, 1657See footnote 3 p. 25, see footnote 6 p. S51.
GC-MS625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
7. BarbanTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
GC/MS625.1.
8. α-BHCGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.1 56410 B-2020See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
9. β-BHCGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
10. δ-BHCGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
11. γ-BHC (Lindane)GC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 , O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.1 56410 B-2020See footnote 11 , O-1126-95.
12. CaptanGC617, 608.36630 B-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7.
13. CarbarylTLCSee footnote 3 p. 94, see footnote 6 p. S60.
HPLC531.1, 632.
HPLC/MS553See footnote 12 O-2060-01.
GC/MS625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
14. CarbophenothionGC617, 608.36630 B-2021See footnote 4 page 27, see footnote 6 p. S73.
GC/MS625.1.
15. ChlordaneGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
16. ChloroprophamTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
GC/MS625.1.
17. 2,4-DGC6156640 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 115, see footnote 4 O-3105-83.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
18. 4,4′-DDDGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3105-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
19. 4,4′-DDEGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 , O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
20. 4,4′-DDTGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
21. Demeton-OGC614, 622See footnote 3 p. 25, see footnote 6 p. S51.
GC/MS625.1
22. Demeton-S.GC614, 622See footnote 3 p. 25, see footnote 6 p. S51.
GC/MS625.1.
23. DiazinonGC507, 614, 622, 1657See footnote 3 p. 25, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 6 p. S51.
GC/MS525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
24. DicambaGC615See footnote 3 p. 115.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
25. DichlofenthionGC622.1See footnote 4 page 27, see footnote 6 p. S73.
26. DichloranGC608.2, 617, 608.36630 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 7.
27. DicofolGC617, 608.3See footnote 4 O-3104-83.
28. DieldrinGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
29. DioxathionGC614.1, 1657See footnote 4 page 27, see footnote 6 p. S73.
30. DisulfotonGC507, 614, 622, 1657See footnote 3 p. 25, see footnote 6 p. S51.
GC/MS525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
31. DiuronTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MS553See footnote 12 O-2060-01.
32. Endosulfan IGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.1 56410 B-2020See footnote 13 O-2002-01.
33. Endosulfan IIGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.1 56410 B-2020See footnote 13 O-2002-01.
34. Endosulfan SulfateGC617, 608.36630 C-2021See footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
35. EndrinGC505, 508, 617, 1656, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.1 56410 B-2020.
36. Endrin aldehydeGC617, 608.36630 C-2021See footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
37. EthionGC614, 614.1, 1657See footnote 4 page 27, see footnote 6 , p. S73.
GC/MS625.1See footnote 13 O-2002-01.
38. FenuronTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
39. Fenuron-TCATLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
40. HeptachlorGC505, 508, 617, 1656, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.16410 B-2020.
41. Heptachlor epoxideGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 6 p. S73, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS625.16410 B-2020.
42. IsodrinGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021See footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 6 p. S73.
GC/MS625.1.
43. LinuronGCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MS553See footnote 12 O-2060-01.
GC/MSSee footnote 11 O-1126-95.
44. MalathionGC614, 16576630 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 25, see footnote 6 p. S51.
GC/MS625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
45. MethiocarbTLCSee footnote 3 p. 94, see footnote 6 p. S60.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
46. MethoxychlorGC505, 508, 608.2, 617, 1656, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83, see footnote 8 3M0222.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
47. MexacarbateTLCSee footnote 3 p. 94, see footnote 6 p. S60.
HPLC632.
GC/MS625.1.
48. MirexGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 4 O-3104-83.
GC/MS625.1.
49. MonuronTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
50. Monuron-TCATLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
51. NeburonTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
52. Parathion methylGC614, 622, 16576630 B-2021See footnote 4 page 27, see footnote 3 p. 25.
GC/MS625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
53. Parathion ethylGC6146630 B-2021See footnote 4 page 27, see footnote 3 p. 25.
GC/MSSee footnote 11 O-1126-95.
54. PCNBGC608.1, 617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90 , D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7.
55. PerthaneGC617, 608.3D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 4 O-3104-83.
56. PrometonGC507, 619See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68, see footnote 9 O-3106-93.
GC/MS525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
57. PrometrynGC507, 619See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68, see footnote 9 O-3106-93.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.1See footnote 13 O-2002-01.
58. PropazineGC507, 619, 1656, 608.3See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68, see footnote 9 O-3106-93.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.1
59. ProphamTLCSee footnote 3 p. 10, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
60. PropoxurTLCSee footnote 3 p. 94, see footnote 6 , p. S60.
HPLC632.
61. SecbumetonTLCSee footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68.
GC619.
62. SiduronTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
HPLC/MSSee footnote 12 O-2060-01.
63. SimazineGC505, 507, 619, 1656, 608.3See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68, see footnote 9 O-3106-93.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.
64. StrobaneGC617, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021See footnote 3 p. 7.
65. SwepTLCSee footnote 3 p. 104, see footnote 6 p. S64.
HPLC632.
66. 2,4,5-TGC6156640 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 115, see footnote 4 O-3105-83.
67. 2,4,5-TP (Silvex)GC6156640 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 115, see footnote 4 O-3105-83.
68. TerbuthylazineGC619, 1656, 608.3See footnote 3 p. 83, see footnote 6 p. S68.
GC/MSSee footnote 13 O-2002-01.
69. ToxapheneGC505, 508, 617, 1656, 608.36630 B-2021 & C-2021D3086-90, D5812-96(02)See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 8 , see footnote 4 O-3105-83.
GC/MS525.1, 525.2, 625.16410 B-2020.
70. TrifluralinGC508, 617, 627, 1656, 608.36630 B-2021See footnote 3 p. 7, see footnote 9 O-3106-93.
GC/MS525.2, 625.1See footnote 11 O-1126-95.

Table ID notes:
1 Pesticides are listed in this table by common name for the convenience of the reader. Additional pesticides may be found under table IC of this section, where entries are listed by chemical name.
2 The standardized test procedure to be used to determine the method detection limit (MDL) for these test procedures is given at appendix B to this part, Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit.
3 Methods for Benzidine, Chlorinated Organic Compounds, Pentachlorophenol and Pesticides in Water and Wastewater. September 1978. U.S. EPA. This EPA publication includes thin-layer chromatography (TLC) methods.
4 Methods for the Determination of Organic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A3. 1987. USGS.
5 The method may be extended to include α-BHC, γ-BHC, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and endrin. However, when they are known to exist, Method 608 is the preferred method.
6 Selected Analytical Methods Approved and Cited by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Supplement to the 15th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 1981. American Public Health Association (APHA).
7 Each analyst must make an initial, one-time, demonstration of their ability to generate acceptable precision and accuracy with Methods 608.3 and 625.1 in accordance with procedures given in Section 8.2 of each of these methods. Additionally, each laboratory, on an on-going basis, must spike and analyze 10% of all samples analyzed with Method 608.3 or 5% of all samples analyzed with Method 625.1 to monitor and evaluate laboratory data quality in accordance with Sections 8.3 and 8.4 of these methods. When the recovery of any parameter falls outside the warning limits, the analytical results for that parameter in the unspiked sample are suspect. The results should be reported, but cannot be used to demonstrate regulatory compliance. These quality control requirements also apply to the Standard Methods, ASTM Methods, and other methods cited.
8 Organochlorine Pesticides and PCBs in Wastewater Using Empore TM Disk. Revised October 28, 1994. 3M Corporation.
9 Method O-3106-93 is in Open File Report 94-37, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Triazine and Other Nitrogen-Containing Compounds by Gas Chromatography with Nitrogen Phosphorus Detectors. 1994. USGS.
10 EPA Methods 608.1, 608.2, 614, 614.1, 615, 617, 619, 622, 622.1, 627, and 632 are found in Methods for the Determination of Nonconventional Pesticides in Municipal and Industrial Wastewater, EPA 821-R-92-002, April 1992, U.S. EPA. EPA Methods 505, 507, 508, 525.1, 531.1 and 553 are in Methods for the Determination of Nonconventional Pesticides in Municipal and Industrial Wastewater, Volume II, EPA 821-R-93-010B, 1993, U.S. EPA. EPA Method 525.2 is in Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water by Liquid-Solid Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, Revision 2.0, 1995, U.S. EPA. EPA methods 1656 and 1657 are in Methods for The Determination of Nonconventional Pesticides In Municipal and Industrial Wastewater, Volume I, EPA 821-R-93-010A, 1993, U.S. EPA. Methods 608.3 and 625.1 are available at: cwa-methods/approved-cwa-test-methods-organic-compounds.
11 Method O-1126-95 is in Open-File Report 95-181, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring. 1995. USGS.
12 Method O-2060-01 is in Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4134, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Pesticides in Water by Graphitized Carbon-Based Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 2001. USGS.
13 Method O-2002-01 is in Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4098, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of moderate-use pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 2001. USGS.
14 Method O-1121-91 is in Open-File Report 91-519, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring. 1992. USGS.
15 Please refer to the following applicable Quality Control Section: Part 6000 Methods, Individual Organic Compounds 6020 (2019). These Quality Control Standards are available for download at www.standardmethods.org at no charge.

* * * * *

Table IH—List of Approved Microbiological Methods for Ambient Water
Parameter and unitsMethod 1EPAStandard methodsAOAC, ASTM, USGSOther
Bacteria
1. Coliform (fecal), number per 100 mLMost Probable Number (MPN), 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 132 39221 E-2014, 9221 F-2014. 32
Membrane filter (MF) 2 , single stepp. 124 39222 D-2015 26B-0050-85. 4
2. Coliform (total), number per 100 mLMPN, 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 114 39221 B-2014.
MF 2 , single step orp. 108 39222 B-2015 27B-0025-85. 4
MF 2 , two step with enrichmentp. 111 39222 B-2015. 27
3. E. coli, number per 100 mLMPN 5713 , multiple tube, or9221 B.3-2014/9221 F-2014. 101232
Multiple tube/multiple well, or9223 B-2016 11991.15 9Colilert® 1115 , Colilert-18®. 111415
MF 2567 , two step, or1103.2 189222 B-2015/9222 I-2015 17 , 9213 D-2007D5392-93. 8
Single step1603.1 19 , 1604 20m-ColiBlue24® 16 , KwikCount EC. 2829
4. Fecal streptococci, number per 100 mLMPN, 5 tube, 3 dilution, orp. 139 39230 B-2013.
MF 2 , orp. 136 39230 C-2013 30B-0055-85. 4
Plate countp. 143. 3
5. Enterococci, number per 100 mLMPN 57 , multiple tube/multiple well, or9230 D-2013D6503-99 8Enterolert®. 1121
MF 2567 two step, or1106.2 229230 C-2013 30D5259-92. 8
Single step, or1600.1 239230 C-2013. 30
Plate countp. 143. 3
Protozoa
6. CryptosporidiumFiltration/IMS/FA1622 24 , 1623 25 , 1623.1. 2531
7. GiardiaFiltration/IMS/FA1623 25 , 1623.1. 2531
Table 1H notes:

1 The method must be specified when results are reported.
2 A 0.45-µm membrane filter (MF) or other pore size certified by the manufacturer to fully retain organisms to be cultivated and to be free of extractables which could interfere with their growth.
3 Microbiological Methods for Monitoring the Environment, Water and Wastes. EPA/600/8-78/017. 1978. US EPA.
4 U.S. Geological Survey Techniques of Water-Resource Investigations, Book 5, Laboratory Analysis, Chapter A4, Methods for Collection and Analysis of Aquatic Biological and Microbiological Samples. 1989. USGS.
5 Tests must be conducted to provide organism enumeration (density). Select the appropriate configuration of tubes/filtrations and dilutions/volumes to account for the quality, character, consistency, and anticipated organism density of the water sample.
6 When the MF method has not been used previously to test waters with high turbidity, large numbers of noncoliform bacteria, or samples that may contain organisms stressed by chlorine, a parallel test should be conducted with a multiple-tube technique to demonstrate applicability and comparability of results.
7 To assess the comparability of results obtained with individual methods, it is suggested that side-by-side tests be conducted across seasons of the year with the water samples routinely tested in accordance with the most current Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater or EPA alternate test procedure (ATP) guidelines.
8 Annual Book of ASTM Standards—Water and Environmental Technology. Section 11.02. 2000, 1999, 1996. ASTM International.
9 Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International, 16th Edition, Volume I, Chapter 17. 1995. AOAC International.
10 The multiple-tube fermentation test is used in 9221B.3-2014. Lactose broth may be used in lieu of lauryl tryptose broth (LTB), if at least 25 parallel tests are conducted between this broth and LTB using the water samples normally tested, and this comparison demonstrates that the false-positive rate and false-negative rate for total coliform using lactose broth is less than 10 percent. No requirement exists to run the completed phase on 10 percent of all total coliform-positive tubes on a seasonal basis.
11 These tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests.
12 After prior enrichment in a presumptive medium for total coliform using 9221B.3-2014, all presumptive tubes or bottles showing any amount of gas, growth or acidity within 48 h ± 3 h of incubation shall be submitted to 9221F-2014. Commercially available EC-MUG media or EC media supplemented in the laboratory with 50 µg/mL of MUG may be used.
13 Samples shall be enumerated by the multiple-tube or multiple-well procedure. Using multiple-tube procedures, employ an appropriate tube and dilution configuration of the sample as needed and report the Most Probable Number (MPN). Samples tested with Colilert® may be enumerated with the multiple-well procedures, Quanti-Tray® or Quanti-Tray®/2000, and the MPN calculated from the table provided by the manufacturer.
14 Colilert-18® is an optimized formulation of the Colilert® for the determination of total coliforms and E. coli that provides results within 18 h of incubation at 35 °C, rather than the 24 h required for the Colilert® test and is recommended for marine water samples.
15 Descriptions of the Colilert®, Colilert-18®, Quanti-Tray ®, and Quanti-Tray®/2000 may be obtained from IDEXX Laboratories Inc.
16 A description of the mColiBlue24® test may be obtained from Hach Company.
17 Subject coliform positive samples determined by 9222B-2015 or other membrane filter procedure to 9222I-2015 using NA-MUG media.
18 Method 1103.2: Escherichia coli ( E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar (mTEC), EPA-821-R-23-009. September 2023. US EPA.
19 Method 1603.1: Escherichia coli ( E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar (Modified mTEC), EPA-821-R-23-008. September 2023 . US EPA.
20 Method 1604: Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli ( E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration by Using a Simultaneous Detection Technique (MI Medium), EPA 821-R-02-024. September 2002. US EPA.
21 A description of the Enterolert® test may be obtained from IDEXX Laboratories Inc.
22 Method 1106.2: Enterococci in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane- Enterococcus -Esculin Iron Agar (mE-EIA), EPA-821-R-23-007. September 2023. US EPA.
23 Method 1600.1: Enterococci in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane- Enterococcus Indoxyl-β-D-Glucoside Agar (mEI), EPA-821-R-21-006. September 2023. US EPA.
24 Method 1622 uses a filtration, concentration, immunomagnetic separation of oocysts from captured material, immunofluorescence assay to determine concentrations, and confirmation through vital dye staining and differential interference contrast microscopy for the detection of Cryptosporidium. Method 1622: Cryptosporidium in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA, EPA-821-R-05-001. December 2005. US EPA.
25 Methods 1623 and 1623.1 use a filtration, concentration, immunomagnetic separation of oocysts and cysts from captured material, immunofluorescence assay to determine concentrations, and confirmation through vital dye staining and differential interference contrast microscopy for the simultaneous detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia oocysts and cysts. Method 1623: Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA. EPA-821-R-05-002. December 2005. US EPA. Method 1623.1: Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA. EPA 816-R-12-001. January 2012. US EPA.
26 On a monthly basis, at least ten blue colonies from positive samples must be verified using Lauryl Tryptose Broth and EC broth, followed by count adjustment based on these results; and representative non-blue colonies should be verified using Lauryl Tryptose Broth. Where possible, verifications should be done from randomized sample sources.
27 On a monthly basis, at least ten sheen colonies from positive samples must be verified using Lauryl Tryptose Broth and brilliant green lactose bile broth, followed by count adjustment based on these results; and representative non-sheen colonies should be verified using Lauryl Tryptose Broth. Where possible, verifications should be done from randomized sample sources.
28 A description of KwikCount EC may be obtained from Roth Bioscience, LLC.
29 Approved for the analyses of E. coli in freshwater only.
30 Verification of colonies by incubation of BHI agar at 10 ± 0.5 °C for 48 ± 3 h is optional. As per the Errata to the 23rd Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater “Growth on a BHI agar plate incubated at 10 ± 0.5 °C for 48 ± 3 h is further verification that the colony belongs to the genus Enterococcus.”
31 Method 1623.1 includes updated acceptance criteria for IPR, OPR, and MS/MSD and clarifications and revisions based on the use of Method 1623 for years and technical support questions.
32 9221 F.2-2014 allows for simultaneous detection of E. coli and thermotolerant fecal coliforms by adding inverted vials to EC-MUG; the inverted vials collect gas produced by thermotolerant fecal coliforms.

* * * *

(b) The material listed in this paragraph (b) is incorporated by reference into this section with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. All approved incorporation by reference (IBR) material is available for inspection at the EPA and at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Contact the EPA at: EPA's Water Docket, EPA West, 1301 Constitution Avenue NW, Room 3334, Washington, DC 20004; telephone: 202-566-2426; email: docket-customerservice@epa.gov. For information on the availability of this material at NARA, visit www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations or email fr.inspection@nara.gov. The material may be obtained from the following sources in this paragraph (b).

(1) Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati OH (US EPA). Available at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm or from: National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161

(i) Microbiological Methods for Monitoring the Environment, Water, and Wastes. 1978. EPA/600/8-78/017, Pub. No. PB-290329/A.S.

(A) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section B Total Coliform Methods, page 108. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(B) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section B Total Coliform Methods, 2.6.2 Two-Step Enrichment Procedure, page 111. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(C) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section B Total Coliform Methods, 4 Most Probable Number (MPN) Method, page 114. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(D) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section C Fecal Coliform Methods, 2 Direct Membrane Filter (MF) Method, page 124. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(E) Part III, Analytical Methodology, Section C Fecal Coliform Methods, 5 Most Probable Number (MPN) Method, page 132. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(F) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section D Fecal Streptococci, 2 Membrane Filter (MF) Method, page 136. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(G) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section D Fecal Streptococci, 4 Most Probable Number Method, page 139. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(H) Part III Analytical Methodology, Section D Fecal Streptococci, 5 Pour Plate Method, page 143. Table IA, Note 3; Table IH, Note 3.

(ii) [Reserved]

(2) Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati OH (US EPA). Available at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm.

(3) National Exposure Risk Laboratory-Cincinnati, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati OH (US EPA). Available from http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm or from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Telephone: 800-553-6847.

(i) Methods for the Determination of Inorganic Substances in Environmental Samples. August 1993. EPA/600/R-93/100, Pub. No. PB 94120821. Table IB, Note 52.

(A) Method 180.1, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(B) Method 300.0, Determination of Inorganic Anions by Ion Chromatography. Revision 2.1. Table IB, Note 52.

(C) Method 335.4, Determination of Total Cyanide by Semi-Automated Colorimetry. Revision 1.0. Table IB, Notes 52 and 57.

(D) Method 350.1, Determination of Ammonium Nitrogen by Semi-Automated Colorimetry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Notes 30 and 52.

(E) Method 351.2, Determination of Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen by Semi-Automated Colorimetry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(F) Method 353.2, Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite Automated Colorimetry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(G) Method 365.1, Determination of Phosphorus by Automated Colorimetry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(H) Method 375.2, Determination of Sulfate by Automated Colorimetry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(I) Method 410.4, Determination of Chemical Oxygen Demand by Semi-Automated Colorimetry. Revision 2.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(ii) Methods for the Determination of Metals in Environmental Samples, Supplement I. May 1994. EPA/600/R-94/111, Pub. No. PB 95125472. Table IB, Note 52.

(A) Method 200.7, Determination of Metals and Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Revision 4.4. Table IB, Note 52.

(B) Method 200.8, Determination of Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Revision 5.3. Table IB, Note 52.

(C) Method 200.9, Determination of Trace Elements by Stabilized Temperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Revision 2.2. Table IB, Note 52.

(D) Method 218.6, Determination of Dissolved Hexavalent Chromium in Drinking Water, Groundwater, and Industrial Wastewater Effluents by Ion Chromatography. Revision 3.3. Table IB, Note 52.

(E) Method 245.1, Determination of Mercury in Water by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Revision 3.0. Table IB, Note 52.

(4) National Exposure Risk Laboratory-Cincinnati, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati OH (US EPA). Available at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm.

(i) EPA Method 200.5, Determination of Trace Elements in Drinking Water by Axially Viewed Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Revision 4.2, October 2003. EPA/600/R-06/115. Table IB, Note 68.

(ii) EPA Method 525.2, Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water by Liquid-Solid Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Revision 2.0, 1995. Table ID, Note 10.

(5) Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati OH. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati OH (US EPA). Available at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm or from ORD Publications, CERI, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati OH 45268.

(i) Methods for Benzidine, Chlorinated Organic Compounds, Pentachlorophenol, and Pesticides in Water and Wastewater. 1978. Table IC, Note 3; Table ID, Note 3.

(ii) Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes. March 1979. EPA-600/4-79-020. Table IB, Note 1.

(iii) Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes. Revised March 1983. EPA-600/4-79-020. Table IB, Note 1.

(A) Method 120.1, Conductance, Specific Conductance, μmhos at 25°C. Revision 1982. Table IB, Note 1.

(B) Method 130.1, Hardness, Total (mg/L as CaCO3), Colorimetric, Automated EDTA. Issued 1971. Table IB, Note 1.

(C) Method 150.2, pH, Continuous Monitoring (Electrometric). December 1982. Table IB, Note 1.

(D) Method 160.4, Residue, Volatile, Gravimetric, Ignition at 550°C. Issued 1971. Table IB, Note 1.

(E) Method 206.5, Arsenic, Sample Digestion Prior to Total Arsenic Analysis by Silver Diethyldithiocarbamate or Hydride Procedures. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(F) Method 231.2, Gold, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(G) Method 245.2, Mercury, Automated Cold Vapor Technique. Issued 1974. Table IB, Note 1.

(H) Method 252.2, Osmium, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(I) Method 253.2, Palladium, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(J) Method 255.2, Platinum, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(K) Method 265.2, Rhodium, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(L) Method 279.2, Thallium, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(M) Method 283.2, Titanium, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(N) Method 289.2, Zinc, Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(O) Method 310.2, Alkalinity, Colorimetric, Automated, Methyl Orange. Revision 1974. Table IB, Note 1.

(P) Method 351.1, Nitrogen, Kjeldahl, Total, Colorimetric, Automated Phenate. Revision 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(Q) Method 352.1, Nitrogen, Nitrate, Colorimetric, Brucine. Issued 1971. Table IB, Note 1.

(R) Method 365.3, Phosphorus, All Forms, Colorimetric, Ascorbic Acid, Two Reagent. Issued 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(S) Method 365.4, Phosphorus, Total, Colorimetric, Automated, Block Digestor AA II. Issued 1974. Table IB, Note 1.

(T) Method 410.3, Chemical Oxygen Demand, Titrimetric, High Level for Saline Waters. Revision 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(U) Method 420.1, Phenolics, Total Recoverable, Spectrophotometric, Manual 4-AAP With Distillation. Revision 1978. Table IB, Note 1.

(iv) Prescribed Procedures for Measurement of Radioactivity in Drinking Water. 1980. EPA-600/4-80-032. Table IE.

(A) Method 900.0, Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Radioactivity. Table IE.

(B) Method 903.0, Alpha-Emitting iRadio Isotopes. Table IE.

(C) Method 903.1, Radium-226, Radon Emanation Technique. Table IE.

(D) Appendix B, Error and Statistical Calculations. Table IE.

(6) Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC (US EPA). Available at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm.

(i) Method 1625C, Semivolatile Organic Compounds by Isotope Dilution GCMS. 1989. Table IF.

(ii) [Reserved]

(7) Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC (US EPA). Available at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/methods/cwa/index.cfm or from National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161.

(i) Method 1631, Mercury in Water by Oxidation, Purge and Trap, and Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry. Revision E, August 2002. EPA-821-R-02-019, Pub. No. PB2002-108220. Table IB, Note 43.

(ii) Kelada-01, Kelada Automated Test Methods for Total Cyanide, Acid Dissociable Cyanide, and Thiocyanate. Revision 1.2, August 2001. EPA 821-B-01-009, Pub. No. PB 2001-108275. Table IB, Note 55.

(iii) In the compendium Analytical Methods for the Determination of Pollutants in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Industry Wastewaters. July 1998. EPA 821-B-98-016, Pub. No. PB95201679. Table IF, Note 1.

(A) EPA Method 1666, Volatile Organic Compounds Specific to the Pharmaceutical Industry by Isotope Dilution GC/MS. Table IF, Note 1.

(B) EPA Method 1667, Formaldehyde, Isobutyraldehyde, and Furfural by Derivatization Followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Table IF.

(C) Method 1671, Volatile Organic Compounds Specific to the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Industry by GC/FID. Table IF.

(iv) Methods For The Determination of Nonconventional Pesticides In Municipal and Industrial Wastewater, Volume I. Revision I, August 1993. EPA 821-R-93-010A, Pub. No. PB 94121654. Tables ID, IG.

(A) Method 608.1, Organochlorine Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(B) Method 608.2, Certain Organochlorine Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(C) Method 614, Organophosphorus Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(D) Method 614.1, Organophosphorus Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(E) Method 615, Chlorinated Herbicides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(F) Method 617, Organohalide Pesticides and PCBs. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(G) Method 619, Triazine Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(H) Method 622, Organophosphorus Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(I) Method 622.1, Thiophosphate Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(J) Method 627, Dinitroaniline Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Notes 1 and 3.

(K) Method 629, Cyanazine. Table IG, Note 3.

(L) Method 630, Dithiocarbamate Pesticides. Table IG, Note 3.

(M) Method 630.1, Dithiocarbamate Pesticides. Table IG, Note 3.

(N) Method 631, Benomyl and Carbendazim. Table IG, Note 3.

(O) Method 632, Carbamate and Urea Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(P) Method 632.1, Carbamate and Amide Pesticides. Table IG, Note 3.

(Q) Method 633, Organonitrogen Pesticides. Table IG, Note 3.

(R) Method 633.1, Neutral Nitrogen-Containing Pesticides. Table IG, Note 3.

(S) Method 637, MBTS and TCMTB. Table IG, Note 3.

(T) Method 644, Picloram. Table IG, Note 3.

(U) Method 645, Certain Amine Pesticides and Lethane. Table IG, Note 3.

(V) Method 1656, Organohalide Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Notes 1 and 3.

(W) Method 1657, Organophosphorus Pesticides. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(X) Method 1658, Phenoxy-Acid Herbicides. Table IG, Note 3.

(Y) Method 1659, Dazomet. Table IG, Note 3.

(Z) Method 1660, Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids. Table IG, Note 3.

(AA) Method 1661, Bromoxynil. Table IG, Note 3.

(BB) Ind-01. Methods EV-024 and EV-025, Analytical Procedures for Determining Total Tin and Triorganotin in Wastewater. Table IG, Note 3.

(v) Methods For The Determination of Nonconventional Pesticides In Municipal and Industrial Wastewater, Volume II. August 1993. EPA 821-R-93-010B, Pub. No. PB 94166311. Table IG.

(A) Method 200.9, Determination of Trace Elements by Stabilized Temperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Table IG, Note 3.

(B) Method 505, Analysis of Organohalide Pesticides and Commercial Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Products in Water by Microextraction and Gas Chromatography. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(C) Method 507, The Determination of Nitrogen- and Phosphorus-Containing Pesticides in Water by Gas Chromatography with a Nitrogen-Phosphorus Detector. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(D) Method 508, Determination of Chlorinated Pesticides in Water by Gas Chromatography with an Electron Capture Detector. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(E) Method 515.1, Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Water by Gas Chromatography with an Electron Capture Detector. Table IG, Notes 2 and 3.

(F) Method 515.2, Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Water Using Liquid-Solid Extraction and Gas Chromatography with an Electron Capture Detector. Table IG, Notes 2 and 3.

(G) Method 525.1, Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water by Liquids-Solid Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(H) Method 531.1, Measurement of N-Methylcarbamoyloximes and N-Methylcarbamates in Water by Direct Aqueous Injection HPLC with Post-Column Derivatization. Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(I) Method 547, Determination of Glyphosate in Drinking Water by Direct-Aqueous-Injection HPLC, Post-Column Derivatization, and Fluorescence Detection. Table IG, Note 3.

(J) Method 548, Determination of Endothall in Drinking Water by Aqueous Derivatization, Liquid-Solid Extraction, and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detector. Table IG, Note 3.

(K) Method 548.1, Determination of Endothall in Drinking Water by Ion-Exchange Extraction, Acidic Methanol Methylation and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Table IG, Note 3.

(L) Method 553, Determination of Benzidines and Nitrogen-Containing Pesticides in Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction or Liquid-Solid Extraction and Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Particle Beam/Mass Spectrometry Table ID, Note 10; Table IG, Note 3.

(M) Method 555, Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Water by High Performance Liquid Chromatography With a Photodiode Array Ultraviolet Detector. Table IG, Note 3.

(vi) In the compendium Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water. Revised July 1991, December 1998. EPA-600/4-88-039, Pub. No. PB92-207703. Table IF.

(A) EPA Method 502.2, Volatile Organic Compounds in Water by Purge and Trap Capillary Column Gas Chromatography with Photoionization and Electrolytic Conductivity Detectors in Series. Table IF.

(B) [Reserved]

(vii) In the compendium Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water-Supplement II. August 1992. EPA-600/R-92-129, Pub. No. PB92-207703. Table IF.

(A) EPA Method 524.2, Measurement of Purgeable Organic Compounds in Water by Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Table IF.

(B) [Reserved]

(viii) Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms, Fifth Edition. October 2002. EPA 821-R-02-012, Pub. No. PB2002-108488. Table IA, Note 26.

(ix) Short-Term Methods for Measuring the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, Fourth Edition. October 2002. EPA 821-R-02-013, Pub. No. PB2002-108489. Table IA, Note 27.

(x) Short-Term Methods for Measuring the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Marine and Estuarine Organisms, Third Edition. October 2002. EPA 821-R-02-014, Pub. No. PB2002-108490. Table IA, Note 28.

(8) Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), mail code 4303T, 1301 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20460; website: www.epa.gov/cwa-methods.

(i) Method 245.7, Mercury in Water by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry. Revision 2.0, February 2005. EPA-821-R-05-001. Table IB, Note 17.

(ii) Method 1103.2: Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar (mTEC), EPA-821-R-23-009. September 2023. Table IH, Note 18.

(iii) Method 1106.2: Enterococci in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane- Enterococcus -Esculin Iron Agar (mE-EIA), EPA-821-R-23-007. September 2023. Table IH, Note 22.

(iv) Method 1600.1: Enterococci in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane- Enterococcus Indoxyl-β-D-Glucoside Agar (mEI), EPA-821-R-23-006, September 2023. Table 1A, Note 24; Table IH, Note 23.

(v) Method 1603.1: Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar (Modified mTEC), EPA-821-R-23-008, September 2023. Table IA, Note 21; Table IH, Note 19.

(vi) Method 1604: Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli ( E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using a Simultaneous Detection Technique (MI Medium). September 2002. EPA-821-R-02-024. Table IH, Note 21.

(vii) Whole Effluent Toxicity Methods Errata Sheet, EPA 821-R-02-012-ES. December 2016, Table IA, Notes 25, 26, and 27.

(viii) Method 1623: Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA. December 2005. EPA-821-R-05-002. Table IH, Note 26.

(ix) Method 1623.1: Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA. EPA 816-R-12-001. January 2012. U.S. EPA, Table IH, Notes 25 and 31.

(x) Method 1627, Kinetic Test Method for the Prediction of Mine Drainage Quality. December 2011. EPA-821-R-09-002. Table IB, Note 69.

(xi) Method 1664, n -Hexane Extractable Material (HEM; Oil and Grease) and Silica Gel Treated n -Hexane Extractable Material (SGT-HEM; Nonpolar Material) by Extraction and Gravimetry. Revision A, February 1999. EPA-821-R-98-002. Table IB, Notes 38 and 42.

(xii) Method 1664, n -Hexane Extractable Material (HEM; Oil and Grease) and Silica Gel Treated n -Hexane Extractable Material (SGT-HEM; Nonpolar Material) by Extraction and Gravimetry, Revision B, February 2010. EPA-821-R-10-001. Table IB, Notes 38 and 42.

(xiii) Method 1669, Sampling Ambient Water for Trace Metals at EPA Water Quality Criteria Levels. July 1996. Table IB, Note 43.

(xiv) Method 1680: Fecal Coliforms in Sewage Sludge (Biosolids) by Multiple-Tube Fermentation using Lauryl Tryptose Broth (LTB) and EC Medium. September 2014. EPA-821-R-14-009.Table IA, Note 15.

(xv) Method 1681: Fecal Coliforms in Sewage Sludge (Biosolids) by Multiple-Tube Fermentation using A-1 Medium. July 2006. EPA 821-R-06-013. Table IA, Note 20.

(xvi) Method 1682: Salmonella in Sewage Sludge (Biosolids) by Modified Semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) Medium. September 2014. EPA 821-R-14-012. Table IA, Note 23.

(9) American National Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York NY 10018.

(i) ANSI. American National Standard on Photographic Processing Effluents. April 2, 1975. Table IB, Note 9.

(ii) [Reserved]

(10) American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001; phone: (202)777-2742, website: www.standardmethods.org.

(i) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 14th Edition, 1975. Table IB, Notes 27 and 86.

(ii) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 15th Edition, 1980, Table IB, Note 30; Table ID.

(iii) Selected Analytical Methods Approved and Cited by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Supplement to the 15th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 1981. Table IC, Note 6; Table ID, Note 6.

(iv) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 18th Edition, 1992. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(v) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 19th Edition, 1995. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(vi) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 20th Edition, 1998. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(vii) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 21st Edition, 2005. Table IB, Notes 17 and 27.

(viii) 2120, Color. Revised September 4, 2021. Table IB.

(ix) 2130, Turbidity. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(x) 2310, Acidity. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xi) 2320, Alkalinity. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xii) 2340, Hardness. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xiii) 2510, Conductivity. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xiv) 2540, Solids. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xv) 2550, Temperature. 2010. Table IB.

(xvi) 3111, Metals by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Revised 2019. Table IB.

(xvii) 3112, Metals by Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xviii) 3113, Metals by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xix) 3114, Arsenic and Selenium by Hydride Generation/Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Revised 2020, Table IB.

(xx) 3120, Metals by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxi) 3125, Metals by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxii) 3500-Al, Aluminum. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxiii) 3500-As, Arsenic. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxiv) 3500-Ca, Calcium. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxv) 3500-Cr, Chromium. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxvi) 3500-Cu, Copper. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxvii) 3500-Fe, Iron. 2011. Table IB.

(xxviii) 3500-Pb, Lead. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxix) 3500-Mn, Manganese. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxx) 3500-K, Potassium. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxxi) 3500-Na, Sodium. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxxii) 3500-V, Vanadium. 2011. Table IB.

(xxxiii) 3500-Zn, Zinc. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxxiv) 4110, Determination of Anions by Ion Chromatography. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxxv) 4140, Inorganic Anions by Capillary Ion Electrophoresis. Revised 2020. Table IB.

(xxxvi) 4500-B, Boron. 2011. Table IB.

(xxxvii) 4500 Cl , Chloride. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xxxviii) 4500-Cl, Chlorine (Residual). 2011. Table IB.

(xxxix) 4500-CN , Cyanide. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xl) 4500-F , Fluoride. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xli) 4500-H + , pH. 2021. Table IB.

(xlii) 4500-NH 3 , Nitrogen (Ammonia). Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xliii) 4500-NO 2 , Nitrogen (Nitrite). Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xliv) 4500-NO 3 , Nitrogen (Nitrate). Revised 2019. Table IB.

(xlv) 4500-N (org) , Nitrogen (Organic). Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xlvi) 4500-O, Oxygen (Dissolved). Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xlvii) 4500-P, Phosphorus. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xlviii) 4500-SiO 2 , Silica. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(xlix) 4500-S 2− , Sulfide. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(l) 4500-SO 32− , Sulfite. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(li) 4500-SO 42− , Sulfate. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(lii) 5210, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD). Revised 2016. Table IB.

(liii) 5220, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). 2011. Table IB.

(liv) 5310, Total Organic Carbon (TOC). Revised 2014. Table IB.

(lv) 5520, Oil and Grease. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(lvi) 5530, Phenols. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(lvii) 5540, Surfactants. Revised 2021. Table IB.

(lviii) 6200, Volatile Organic Compounds. Revised 2020. Table IC.

(lix) 6410, Extractable Base/Neutrals and Acids. Revised 2020. Tables IC and ID.

(lx) 6420, Phenols. Revised 2021. Table IC.

(lxi) 6440, Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Revised 2021. Table IC.

(lxii) 6630, Organochlorine Pesticides. Revised 2021. Table ID.

(lxiii) 6640, Acidic Herbicide Compounds. Revised 2021. Table ID.

(lxiv) 7110, Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Radioactivity (Total, Suspended, and Dissolved). 2000. Table IE.

(lxv) 7500, Radium. 2001. Table IE.

(lxvi) 9213, Recreational Waters. 2007. Table IH.

(lxvii) 9221, Multiple-Tube Fermentation Technique for Members of the Coliform Group. Approved 2014. Table IA, Notes 12, 14; and 33; Table IH, Notes 10, 12, and 32.

(lxviii) 9222, Membrane Filter Technique for Members of the Coliform Group. 2015. Table IA, Note 31; Table IH, Note 17.

(lxix) 9223 Enzyme Substrate Coliform Test. 2016. Table IA; Table IH.

(lxx) 9230 Fecal Enterococcus/Streptococcus Groups. 2013. Table IA, Note 32; Table IH.

(11) The Analyst, The Royal Society of Chemistry, RSC Publishing, Royal Society of Chemistry, Thomas Graham House, Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0WF, United Kingdom. (Also available from most public libraries.)

(i) Spectrophotometric Determination of Ammonia: A Study of a Modified Berthelot Reaction Using Salicylate and Dichloroisocyanurate. Krom, M.D. 105:305-316, April 1980. Table IB, Note 60.

(ii) [Reserved]

(12) Analytical Chemistry, ACS Publications, 1155 Sixteenth St. NW., Washington DC 20036. (Also available from most public libraries.)

(i) Spectrophotometric and Kinetics Investigation of the Berthelot Reaction for the Determination of Ammonia. Patton, C.J. and S.R. Crouch. 49(3):464-469, March 1977. Table IB, Note 60.

(ii) [Reserved]

(13) AOAC International, 481 North Frederick Avenue, Suite 500, Gaithersburg, MD 20877-2417.

(i) Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International. 16th Edition, 4th Revision, 1998.

(A) 920.203, Manganese in Water, Persulfate Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(B) 925.54, Sulfate in Water, Gravimetric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(C) 973.40, Specific Conductance of Water. Table IB, Note 3.

(D) 973.41, pH of Water. Table IB, Note 3.

(E) 973.43, Alkalinity of Water, Titrimetric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(F) 973.44, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) of Water, Incubation Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(G) 973.45, Oxygen (Dissolved) in Water, Titrimetric Methods. Table IB, Note 3.

(H) 973.46, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of Water, Titrimetric Methods. Table IB, Note 3.

(I) 973.47, Organic Carbon in Water, Infrared Analyzer Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(J) 973.48, Nitrogen (Total) in Water, Kjeldahl Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(K) 973.49, Nitrogen (Ammonia) in Water, Colorimetric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(L) 973.50, Nitrogen (Nitrate) in Water, Brucine Colorimetric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(M) 973.51, Chloride in Water, Mercuric Nitrate Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(N) 973.52, Hardness of Water. Table IB, Note 3.

(O) 973.53, Potassium in Water, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(P) 973.54, Sodium in Water, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(Q) 973.55, Phosphorus in Water, Photometric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(R) 973.56, Phosphorus in Water, Automated Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(S) 974.27, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Lead, Magnesium, Manganese, Silver, Zinc in Water, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(T) 977.22, Mercury in Water, Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(U) 991.15. Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli in Water Defined Substrate Technology (Colilert) Method. Table IA, Note 10; Table IH, Note 10.

(V) 993.14, Trace Elements in Waters and Wastewaters, Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometric Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(W) 993.23, Dissolved Hexavalent Chromium in Drinking Water, Ground Water, and Industrial Wastewater Effluents, Ion Chromatographic Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(X) 993.30, Inorganic Anions in Water, Ion Chromatographic Method. Table IB, Note 3.

(ii) [Reserved]

(14) Applied and Environmental Microbiology, American Society for Microbiology, 1752 N Street NW., Washington DC 20036. (Also available from most public libraries.)

(i) New Medium for the Simultaneous Detection of Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli in Water. Brenner, K.P., C.C. Rankin, Y.R. Roybal, G.N. Stelma, Jr., P.V. Scarpino, and A.P. Dufour. 59:3534-3544, November 1993. Table IH, Note 21.

(ii) [Reserved]

(15) ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959; phone: (877)909-2786; website: www.astm.org.

(i) Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Water, and Environmental Technology, Section 11, Volumes 11.01 and 11.02. 1994. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(ii) Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Water, and Environmental Technology, Section 11, Volumes 11.01 and 11.02. 1996. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(iii) Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Water, and Environmental Technology, Section 11, Volumes 11.01 and 11.02. 1999. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(iv) Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Water, and Environmental Technology, Section 11, Volumes 11.01 and 11.02. 2000. Tables IA, IB, IC, ID, IE, and IH.

(v) ASTM D511-14, Standard Test Methods for Calcium and Magnesium in Water. Approved October 1, 2014. Table IB.

(vi) ASTM D512-12, Standard Test Methods for Chloride Ion in Water. Approved June 15, 2012. Table IB.

(vii) ASTM D515-88, Test Methods for Phosphorus in Water, March 1989. Table IB.

(viii) ASTM D516-16, Standard Test Method for Sulfate Ion in Water. Approved June 1, 2016. Table IB.

(ix) ASTM D858-17, Standard Test Methods for Manganese in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(x) ASTM D859-16, Standard Test Method for Silica in Water. Approved June 15, 2016. Table IB.

(xi) ASTM D888-18, Standard Test Methods for Dissolved Oxygen in Water. Approved May 1, 2018. Table IB.

(xii) ASTM D1067-16, Standard Test Methods for Acidity or Alkalinity of Water. Approved June 15, 2016. Table IB.

(xiii) ASTM D1068-15, Standard Test Methods for Iron in Water. Approved October 1, 2015. Table IB.

(xiv) ASTM D1125-95 (Reapproved 1999), Standard Test Methods for Electrical Conductivity and Resistivity of Water. December 1995. Table IB.

(xv) ASTM D1126-17, Standard Test Method for Hardness in Water. Approved December 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xvi) ASTM D1179-16, Standard Test Methods for Fluoride Ion in Water. Approved June 15, 2016. Table IB.

(xvii) ASTM D1246-16, Standard Test Method for Bromide Ion in Water. June 15, 2016. Table IB.

(xviii) ASTM D1252-06 (Reapproved 2012), Standard Test Methods for Chemical Oxygen Demand (Dichromate Oxygen Demand) of Water. Approved June 15, 2012. Table IB.

(xix) ASTM D1253-14, Standard Test Method for Residual Chlorine in Water. Approved January 15, 2014. Table IB.

(xx) ASTM D1293-18, Standard Test Methods for pH of Water. Approved January 15, 2018. Table IB.

(xxi) ASTM D1426-15, Standard Test Methods for Ammonia Nitrogen in Water. Approved March 15, 2015. Table IB.

(xxii) ASTM D1687-17, Standard Test Methods for Chromium in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xxiii) ASTM D1688-17, Standard Test Methods for Copper in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xxiv) ASTM D1691-17, Standard Test Methods for Zinc in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xxv) ASTM D1783-01 (Reapproved 2012), Standard Test Methods for Phenolic Compounds in Water. Approved June 15, 2012. Table IB.

(xxvi) ASTM D1886-14, Standard Test Methods for Nickel in Water. Approved October 1, 2014. Table IB.

(xxvii) ASTM D1889-00, Standard Test Method for Turbidity of Water. October 2000. Table IB.

(xxviii) ASTM D1890-96, Standard Test Method for Beta Particle Radioactivity of Water. April 1996. Table IE.

(xxix) ASTM D1943-96, Standard Test Method for Alpha Particle Radioactivity of Water. April 1996. Table IE.

(xxx) ASTM D1976-20, Standard Test Method for Elements in Water by Inductively-Coupled Argon Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. Approved May 1, 2020. Table IB.

(xxxi) ASTM D2036-09 (Reapproved 2015), Standard Test Methods for Cyanides in Water. Approved July 15, 2015. Table IB.

(xxxii) ASTM D2330-20, Standard Test Method for Methylene Blue Active Substances. Approved January 1, 2020. Table 1B.

(xxxiii) ASTM D2460-97, Standard Test Method for Alpha-Particle-Emitting Isotopes of Radium in Water. October 1997. Table IE.

(xxxiv) ASTM D2972-15, Standard Tests Method for Arsenic in Water. Approved February 1, 2015. Table IB.

(xxxv) ASTM D3223-17, Standard Test Method for Total Mercury in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xxxvi) ASTM D3371-95, Standard Test Method for Nitriles in Aqueous Solution by Gas-Liquid Chromatography, February 1996. Table IF.

(xxxvii) ASTM D3373-17, Standard Test Method for Vanadium in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xxxviii) ASTM D3454-97, Standard Test Method for Radium-226 in Water. February 1998. Table IE.

(xxxix) ASTM D3557-17, Standard Test Method for Cadmium in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xl) ASTM D3558-15, Standard Test Method for Cobalt in Water. Approved February 1, 2015. Table IB.

(xli) ASTM D3559-15, Standard Test Methods for Lead in Water. Approved June 1, 2015. Table IB.

(xlii) ASTM D3590-17, Standard Test Methods for Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen in Water. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(xliii) ASTM D3645-15, Standard Test Methods for Beryllium in Water. Approved February 1, 2015. Table IB.

(xliv) ASTM D3695-95, Standard Test Method for Volatile Alcohols in Water by Direct Aqueous-Injection Gas Chromatography. April 1995. Table IF.

(xlv) ASTM D3859-15, Standard Test Methods for Selenium in Water. Approved March 15, 2015. Table IB.

(xlvi) ASTM D3867-16, Standard Test Method for Nitrite-Nitrate in Water. Approved June 1, 2016. Table IB.

(xlvii) ASTM D4190-15, Standard Test Method for Elements in Water by Direct- Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. Approved February 1, 2015. Table IB.

(xlviii) ASTM D4282-15, Standard Test Method for Determination of Free Cyanide in Water and Wastewater by Microdiffusion. Approved July 15, 2015. Table IB.

(xlix) ASTM D4327-17, Standard Test Method for Anions in Water by Suppressed Ion Chromatography. Approved December 1, 2017. Table IB.

(l) ASTM D4382-18, Standard Test Method for Barium in Water, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry, Graphite Furnace. Approved February 1, 2018. Table IB.

(li) ASTM D4657-92 (Reapproved 1998), Standard Test Method for Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Water. January 1993. Table IC.

(lii) ASTM D4658-15, Standard Test Method for Sulfide Ion in Water. Approved March 15, 2015. Table IB.

(liii) ASTM D4763-88 (Reapproved 2001), Standard Practice for Identification of Chemicals in Water by Fluorescence Spectroscopy. September 1988. Table IF.

(liv) ASTM D4839-03 (Reapproved 2017), Standard Test Method for Total Carbon and Organic Carbon in Water by Ultraviolet, or Persulfate Oxidation, or Both, and Infrared Detection. Approved December 15, 2017. Table IB.

(lv) ASTM D5257-17, Standard Test Method for Dissolved Hexavalent Chromium in Water by Ion Chromatography. Approved December 1, 2017. Table IB.

(lvi) ASTM D5259-92, Standard Test Method for Isolation and Enumeration of Enterococci from Water by the Membrane Filter Procedure. October 1992. Table IH, Note 9.

(lvii) ASTM D5392-93, Standard Test Method for Isolation and Enumeration of Escherichia coli in Water by the Two-Step Membrane Filter Procedure. September 1993. Table IH, Note 9.

(lviii) ASTM D5673-16, Standard Test Method for Elements in Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma—Mass Spectrometry. Approved February 1, 2016. Table IB.

(lix) ASTM D5907-18, Standard Test Methods for Filterable Matter (Total Dissolved Solids) and Nonfilterable Matter (Total Suspended Solids) in Water. Approved May 1, 2018. Table IB.

(lx) ASTM D6503-99, Standard Test Method for Enterococci in Water Using Enterolert. April 2000. Table IA Note 9, Table IH, Note 9.

(lxi) ASTM. D6508-15, Standard Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte. Approved October 1, 2015. Table IB, Note 54.

(lxii) ASTM. D6888-16, Standard Test Method for Available Cyanides with Ligand Displacement and Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) Utilizing Gas Diffusion Separation and Amperometric Detection. Approved February 1, 2016. Table IB, Note 59.

(lxiii) ASTM. D6919-17, Standard Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Alkali and Alkaline Earth Cations and Ammonium in Water and Wastewater by Ion Chromatography. Approved June 1, 2017. Table IB.

(lxiv) ASTM. D7065-17, Standard Test Method for Determination of Nonylphenol, Bisphenol A, p-tert -Octylphenol, Nonylphenol Monoethoxylate and Nonylphenol Diethoxylate in Environmental Waters by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. Approved December 15, 2017. Table IC.

(lxv) ASTM D7237-18, Standard Test Method for Free Cyanide with Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) Utilizing Gas Diffusion Separation and Amperometric Detection. Approved December 1, 2018. Table IB.

(lxvi) ASTM D7284-20, Standard Test Method for Total Cyanide in Water by Micro Distillation followed by Flow Injection Analysis with Gas Diffusion Separation and Amperometric Detection. Approved August 1, 2020. Table IB.

(lxvii) ASTM D7365-09a (Reapproved 2015), Standard Practice for Sampling, Preservation and Mitigating Interferences in Water Samples for Analysis of Cyanide. Approved July 15, 2015. Table II, Notes 5 and 6.

(lxviii) ASTM. D7511-12 (Reapproved 2017) e1 , Standard Test Method for Total Cyanide by Segmented Flow Injection Analysis, In-Line Ultraviolet Digestion and Amperometric Detection. Approved July 1, 2017. Table IB.

(lxix) ASTM D7573-18a e1 , Standard Test Method for Total Carbon and Organic Carbon in Water by High Temperature Catalytic Combustion and Infrared Detection. Approved December 15, 2018. Table IB.

(lxx) ASTM D7781-14, Standard Test Method for Nitrite-Nitrate in Water by Nitrate Reductase, Approved April 1, 2014. Table IB.

(16) Bran & Luebbe Analyzing Technologies, Inc., Elmsford NY 10523.

(i) Industrial Method Number 378-75WA, Hydrogen Ion (pH) Automated Electrode Method, Bran & Luebbe (Technicon) Auto Analyzer II. October 1976. Table IB, Note 21.

(ii) [Reserved]

(17) CEM Corporation, P.O. Box 200, Matthews NC 28106-0200.

(i) Closed Vessel Microwave Digestion of Wastewater Samples for Determination of Metals. April 16, 1992. Table IB, Note 36.

(ii) [Reserved]

(18) Craig R. Chinchilla, 900 Jorie Blvd., Suite 35, Oak Brook IL 60523. Telephone: 630-645-0600.

(i) Nitrate by Discrete Analysis Easy (1-Reagent) Nitrate Method, (Colorimetric, Automated, 1 Reagent). Revision 1, November 12, 2011. Table IB, Note 62.

(ii) [Reserved]

(19) FIAlab Instruments, Inc., 334 2151 N. Northlake Way, Seattle, WA 98103; phone: (425)376-0450; website: www.flowinjection.com/app-notes/epafialab100.

(i) FIAlab 100, Determination of Inorganic Ammonia by Continuous Flow Gas Diffusion and Fluorescence Detector Analysis, April 4, 2018. Table IB, Note 82.

(ii) [Reserved]

(20) Hach Company, P.O. Box 389, Loveland CO 80537.

(i) Method 8000, Chemical Oxygen Demand. Hach Handbook of Water Analysis. 1979. Table IB, Note 14.

(ii) Method 8008, 1,10-Phenanthroline Method using FerroVer Iron Reagent for Water. 1980. Table IB, Note 22.

(iii) Method 8009, Zincon Method for Zinc. Hach Handbook for Water Analysis. 1979. Table IB, Note 33.

(iv) Method 8034, Periodate Oxidation Method for Manganese. Hach Handbook for Water Analysis. 1979. Table IB, Note 23.

(v) Method 8506, Bicinchoninate Method for Copper. Hach Handbook of Water Analysis. 1979. Table IB, Note 19.

(vi) Method 8507, Nitrogen, Nitrite-Low Range, Diazotization Method for Water and Wastewater. 1979. Table IB, Note 25.

(vii) Method 10206, Hach Company TNTplus 835/836 Nitrate Method 10206, Spectrophotometric Measurement of Nitrate in Water and Wastewater. Revision 2.1, January 10, 2013. Table IB, Note 75.

(viii) Method 10242, Hach Company TNTplus 880 Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen Method 10242, Simplified Spectrophotometric Measurement of Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen in Water and Wastewater. Revision 1.1, January 10, 2013. Table IB, Note 76.

(ix) Hach Method 10360, Luminescence Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen in Water and Wastewater and for Use in the Determination of BOD5and cBOD5. Revision 1.2, October 2011. Table IB, Note 63.

(x) m-ColiBlue24® Method, for total Coliforms and E. coli. Revision 2, 1999. Table IA, Note 18; Table IH, Note 17.

(21) IDEXX Laboratories Inc., One Idexx Drive, Westbrook ME 04092.

(i) Colilert. 2013. Table IA, Notes 17 and 18; Table IH, Notes 14, 15 and 16.

(ii) Colilert-18. 2013. Table IA, Notes 17 and 18; Table IH, Notes 14, 15 and 16.

(iii) Enterolert. 2013. Table IA, Note 24; Table IH, Note 12.

(iv) Quanti-Tray Insert and Most Probable Number (MPN) Table. 2013. Table IA, Note 18; Table IH, Notes 14 and 16.

(22) In-Situ Incorporated, 221 E. Lincoln Ave., Ft. Collins CO 80524. Telephone: 970-498-1500.

(i) In-Situ Inc. Method 1002-8-2009, Dissolved Oxygen Measurement by Optical Probe. 2009. Table IB, Note 64.

(ii) In-Situ Inc. Method 1003-8-2009, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) Measurement by Optical Probe. 2009. Table IB, Note 10.

(iii) In-Situ Inc. Method 1004-8-2009, Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand (CBOD) Measurement by Optical Probe. 2009. Table IB, Note 35.

(23) Journal of Chromatography, Elsevier/North-Holland, Inc., Journal Information Centre, 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York NY 10164. (Also available from most public libraries.

(i) Direct Determination of Elemental Phosphorus by Gas-Liquid Chromatography. Addison, R.F. and R.G. Ackman. 47(3): 421-426, 1970. Table IB, Note 28.

(ii) [Reserved]

(24) Lachat Instruments, 6645 W. Mill Road, Milwaukee WI 53218, Telephone: 414-358-4200.

(i) QuikChem Method 10-204-00-1-X, Digestion and Distillation of Total Cyanide in Drinking and Wastewaters using MICRO DIST and Determination of Cyanide by Flow Injection Analysis. Revision 2.2, March 2005. Table IB, Note 56.

(ii) [Reserved]

(25) Leck Mitchell, Ph.D., P.E., 656 Independence Valley Dr., Grand Junction CO 81507. Telephone: 970-244-8661.

(i) Mitchell Method M5271, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 1.0, July 31, 2008. Table IB, Note 66.

(ii) Mitchell Method M5331, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 1.0, July 31, 2008. Table IB, Note 65.

(26) MACHEREY-NAGEL GmbH and Co., 2850 Emrick Blvd., Bethlehem, PA 18020; Phone: (888)321-6224.

(i) Method 036/038 NANOCOLOR® COD LR/HR, Spectrophotometric Measurement of Chemical Oxygen Demand in Water and Wastewater, Revision 1.5, May 2018. Table IB, Note 83.

(ii) [Reserved]

(27) Micrology Laboratories, LLC (now known as Roth Bioscience, LLC), 1303 Eisenhower Drive, Goshen, IN 46526; phone: (574)533-3351.

(i) KwikCount TM EC Medium E. coli enzyme substrate test, Rapid Detection of E. coli in Beach Water By KwikCount TM EC Membrane Filtration. 2014. Table IH, Notes 28 and 29.

(ii) [Reserved]

(28) National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvements, Inc. (NCASI), 260 Madison Avenue, New York NY 10016.

(i) NCASI Method TNTP-W10900, Total Nitrogen and Total Phophorus in Pulp and Paper Biologically Treated Effluent by Alkaline Persulfate Digestion. June 2011. Table IB, Note 77.

(ii) NCASI Technical Bulletin No. 253, An Investigation of Improved Procedures for Measurement of Mill Effluent and Receiving Water Color. December 1971. Table IB, Note 18.

(iii) NCASI Technical Bulletin No. 803, An Update of Procedures for the Measurement of Color in Pulp Mill Wastewaters. May 2000. Table IB, Note 18.

(29) The Nitrate Elimination Co., Inc. (NECi), 334 Hecla St., Lake Linden NI 49945.

(i) NECi Method N07-0003, Method for Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis. Revision 9.0. March 2014. Table IB, Note 73.

(ii) [Reserved]

(30) Oceanography International Corporation, 512 West Loop, P.O. Box 2980, College Station TX 77840.

(i) OIC Chemical Oxygen Demand Method. 1978. Table IB, Note 13.

(ii) [Reserved]

(31) OI Analytical, Box 9010, College Station TX 77820-9010.

(i) Method OIA-1677-09, Available Cyanide by Ligand Exchange and Flow Injection Analysis (FIA). Copyright 2010. Table IB, Note 59.

(ii) Method PAI-DK01, Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl, Block Digestion, Steam Distillation, Titrimetric Detection. Revised December 22, 1994. Table IB, Note 39.

(iii) Method PAI-DK02, Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl, Block Digestion, Steam Distillation, Colorimetric Detection. Revised December 22, 1994. Table IB, Note 40.

(iv) Method PAI-DK03, Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl, Block Digestion, Automated FIA Gas Diffusion. Revised December 22, 1994. Table IB, Note 41.

(32) ORION Research Corporation, 840 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138.

(i) ORION Research Instruction Manual, Residual Chlorine Electrode Model 97-70. 1977. Table IB, Note 16.

(ii) [Reserved]

(33) Pace Analytical Services, LLC, 1800 Elm Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; phone: (612)656-2240.

(i) PAM-16130-SSI, Determination of 2,3,7,8-Substituted Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dibenzo- p -Dioxins and Dibenzofurans (CDDs/CDFs) Using Shimadzu Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), Revision 1.1, May 20, 2022. Table IC, Note 17.

(ii) [Reserved]

(34) SGS AXYS Analytical Services, Ltd., 2045 Mills Road, Sidney, British Columbia, Canada, V8L 5X2; phone: (888)373-0881.

(i) SGS AXYS Method 16130, Determination of 2,3,7,8-Substituted Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dibenzo- p -Dioxins and Dibenzofurans (CDDs/CDFs) Using Waters and Agilent Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS/MS)., Revision 1.0, revised August 2020. Table IC, Note 16.

(ii) [Reserved]

(35) Technicon Industrial Systems, Tarrytown NY 10591.

(i) Industrial Method Number 379-75WE Ammonia, Automated Electrode Method, Technicon Auto Analyzer II. February 19, 1976. Table IB, Note 7.

(ii) [Reserved]

(36) Thermo Jarrell Ash Corporation, 27 Forge Parkway, Franklin MA 02038.

(i) Method AES0029. Direct Current Plasma (DCP) Optical Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Elemental Analysis of Water and Wastes. 1986, Revised 1991. Table IB, Note 34.

(ii) [Reserved]

(37) Thermo Scientific, 166 Cummings Center, Beverly MA 01915. Telephone: 1-800-225-1480. www.thermoscientific.com.

(i) Thermo Scientific Orion Method AQ4500, Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry. Revision 5, March 12, 2009. Table IB, Note 67.

(ii) [Reserved]

(38) 3M Corporation, 3M Center Building 220-9E-10, St. Paul MN 55144-1000.

(i) Organochlorine Pesticides and PCBs in Wastewater Using EmporeTMDisk” Test Method 3M 0222. Revised October 28, 1994. Table IC, Note 8; Table ID, Note 8.

(ii) [Reserved]

(39) Timberline Instruments, LLC, 1880 South Flatiron Ct., Unit I, Boulder CO 80301.

(i) Timberline Amonia-001, Determination of Inorganic Ammonia by Continuous Flow Gas Diffusion and Conductivity Cell Analysis. June 24, 2011. Table IB, Note 74.

(ii) [Reserved]

(40) U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of the Interior, Reston, Virginia. Available from USGS Books and Open-File Reports (OFR) Section, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225; phone: (703)648-5953; website: ww.usgs.gov.

(i) Colorimetric determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water by enzymatic reduction, automated discrete analyzer methods. U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, Book 5—Laboratory Analysis, Section B—Methods of the National Water Quality Laboratory, Chapter 8. 2011. Table IB, Note 72.

(ii) Techniques and Methods—Book 5, Laboratory Analysis—Section B, Methods of the National Water Quality Laboratory—Chapter 12, Determination of Heat Purgeable and Ambient Purgeable Volatile Organic Compounds in Water by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry 2016.

(iii) Methods for Determination of Inorganic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, editors, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A1. 1979. Table IB, Note 8.

(iv) Methods for Determination of Inorganic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A1. 1989. Table IB, Notes 2 and 79.

(v) Methods for the Determination of Organic Substances in Water and Fluvial Sediments. Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 5, Chapter A3. 1987. Table IB, Note 24; Table ID, Note 4.

(vi) OFR 76-177, Selected Methods of the U.S. Geological Survey of Analysis of Wastewaters. 1976. Table IE, Note 2.

(vii) OFR 91-519, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Organonitrogen Herbicides in Water by Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry With Selected-Ion Monitoring. 1992. Table ID, Note 14.

(viii) OFR 92-146, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Total Phosphorus by a Kjeldahl Digestion Method and an Automated Colorimetric Finish That Includes Dialysis. 1992. Table IB, Note 48.

(ix) OFR 93-125, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Water and Fluvial Sediments. 1993. Table IB, Notes 51 and 80; Table IC, Note 9.

(x) OFR 93-449, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Chromium in Water by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. 1993. Table IB, Note 46.

(xi) OFR 94-37, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Triazine and Other Nitrogen-containing Compounds by Gas Chromatography with Nitrogen Phosphorus Detectors. 1994. Table ID, Note 9.

(xii) OFR 95-181, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Pesticides in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry With Selected-Ion Monitoring. 1995. Table ID, Note 11.

(xiii) OFR 97-198, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Molybdenum in Water by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. 1997. Table IB, Note 47.

(xiv) OFR 97-829, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of 86 Volatile Organic Compounds in Water by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, Including Detections Less Than Reporting Limits. 1998. Table IC, Note 13.

(xv) OFR 98-165, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Elements in Whole-Water Digests Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. 1998. Table IB, Notes 50 and 81.

(xvi) OFR 98-639, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Arsenic and Selenium in Water and Sediment by Graphite Furnace—Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. 1999. Table IB, Note 49.

(xvii) OFR 00-170, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Ammonium Plus Organic Nitrogen by a Kjeldahl Digestion Method and an Automated Photometric Finish that Includes Digest Cleanup by Gas Diffusion. 2000. Table IB, Note 45.

(xviii) Techniques and Methods Book 5-B1, Determination of Elements in Natural-Water, Biota, Sediment and Soil Samples Using Collision/Reaction Cell Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 1, Section B, Methods of the National Water Quality Laboratory, Book 5, Laboratory Analysis. 2006. Table IB, Note 70.

(xix) U.S. Geological Survey Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 5, Laboratory Analysis, Chapter A4, Methods for Collection and Analysis of Aquatic Biological and Microbiological Samples. 1989. Table IA, Note 4; Table IH, Note 4.

(xx) Water-Resources Investigation Report 01-4098, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Moderate-Use Pesticides and Selected Degradates in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 2001. Table ID, Note 13.

(xxi) Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4132, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Organic Plus Inorganic Mercury in Filtered and Unfiltered Natural Water With Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry. 2001. Table IB, Note 71.

(xxii) Water-Resources Investigation Report 01-4134, Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory—Determination of Pesticides in Water by Graphitized Carbon-Based Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 2001. Table ID, Note 12.

(xxiii) Water Temperature—Influential Factors, Field Measurement and Data Presentation, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey, Book 1, Chapter D1. 1975. Table IB, Note 32.

(41) Waters Corporation, 34 Maple Street, Milford MA 01757, Telephone: 508-482-2131, Fax: 508-482-3625. (i) Method D6508, Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte. Revision 2, December 2000. Table IB, Note 54. (ii) [Reserved]

(i) Method D6508, Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte. Revision 2, December 2000. Table IB, Note 54.

(ii) [Reserved]

* * * *

(e)

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Table II—Required Containers, Preservation Techniques, and Holding Times

* * * *

5 ASTM D7365-09a (15) specifies treatment options for samples containing oxidants (e.g ., chlorine) for cyanide analyses. Also, Section 9060A of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater (23rd edition) addresses dechlorination procedures for microbiological analyses.

2024-04-08T05:00:00Z

EPA Proposed Rule: Significant New Use Rules

EPA is proposing significant new use rules (SNURs) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for chemical substances that were the subject of premanufacture notices (PMNs). The chemical substances received “not likely to present an unreasonable risk” determinations pursuant to TSCA. The SNURs require persons who intend to manufacture (defined by statute to include import) or process any of these chemical substances for an activity that is proposed as a significant new use by this rulemaking to notify EPA at least 90 days before commencing that activity. The required notification initiates EPA's evaluation of the use, under the conditions of use for that chemical substance. In addition, the manufacture or processing for the significant new use may not commence until EPA has conducted a review of the required notification, made an appropriate determination regarding that notification, and taken such actions as required by that determination.

DATES: This proposed rule is published in the Federal Register April 8, 2024, page 24398.

View proposed rule.

2024-04-05T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Ethylene Oxide Emissions Standards for Sterilization Facilities Residual Risk and Technology Review

This action finalizes the residual risk and technology review (RTR) conducted for the Commercial Sterilization Facilities source category regulated under national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) under the Clean Air Act. The EPA is finalizing decisions concerning the RTR, including definitions for affected sources, emission standards for previously unregulated sources, amendments pursuant to the risk review to address ethylene oxide (EtO) emissions from certain sterilization chamber vents (SCVs), aeration room vents (ARVs), chamber exhaust vents (CEVs), and room air emissions, and amendments pursuant to the technology review for certain SCVs and ARVs. In addition, we are taking final action to correct and clarify regulatory provisions related to emissions during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM), including removing exemptions for periods of SSM. We are also taking final action to require owners and operators to demonstrate compliance through the use of EtO continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS), with exceptions for very small users of EtO; add provisions for electronic reporting of performance test results and other reports; and include other technical revisions to improve consistency and clarity. We estimate that these final amendments will reduce EtO emissions from this source category by approximately 21 tons per year (tpy).

DATES: This final rule is effective on April 5, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 5, 2024, page 24090.

View final rule.

Appendix B to Part 60—Performance Specifications
Performance Specification 19AddedView text
Appendix F to Part 60—Quality Assurance Procedures
Procedure 7AddedView text
§63.14 Incorporations by reference.
(a), (f), (i) introductory textRevisedView text
(i)(88)-(120)RedesignatedView text
Subpart O—Ethylene Oxide Emissions Standards for Sterilization Facilities
Entire subpartRevisedView text

Previous Text

§63.14 Incorporations by reference.

(a) The materials listed in this section are incorporated by reference into this part with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. To enforce any edition other than that specified in this section, a document must be published in the Federal Register and the material must be available to the public. All approved materials are available for inspection at the Air and Radiation Docket and Information Center (Air Docket) in the EPA Docket Center (EPA/DC) at Rm. 3334, EPA West Bldg., 1301 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC. The EPA/DC Public Reading Room hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number of the EPA/DC Public Reading Room is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the Air Docket is (202) 566-1742. These approved materials are also available for inspection at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, email fedreg.legal@nara.gov or go to www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. In addition, these materials are available from the following sources:

* * * *

(f) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Three Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990, Telephone (800) 843-2763, http://www.asme.org; also available from HIS, Incorporated, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112, Telephone (877) 413-5184, http://global.ihs.com.

(1) ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, Flue and Exhaust Gas Analyses [Part 10, Instruments and Apparatus], issued August 31, 1981, IBR approved for §§63.309(k), 63.457(k), 63.772(e) and (h), 63.865(b), 63.997(e), 63.1282(d) and (g), and 63.1625(b), table 5 to subpart EEEE, §§63.3166(a), 63.3360(e), 63.3545(a), 63.3555(a), 63.4166(a), 63.4362(a), 63.4766(a), 63.4965(a), and 63.5160(d), table 4 to subpart UUUU, table 3 to subpart YYYY, §§63.7822(b), 63.7824(e), 63.7825(b), 63.8000(d), 63.9307(c), 63.9323(a), 63.9621(b) and (c), 63.11148(e), 63.11155(e), 63.11162(f), 63.11163(g), 63.11410(j), 63.11551(a), 63.11646(a), and 63.11945, and table 4 to subpart AAAAA, table 5 to subpart DDDDD, table 4 to subpart JJJJJ, table 4 to subpart KKKKK, table 4 to subpart SSSSS, tables 4 and 5 of subpart UUUUU, table 1 to subpart ZZZZZ, and table 4 to subpart JJJJJJ.

(2) [Reserved]

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(i) ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, Post Office Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959, Telephone (610) 832-9585, http://www.astm.org; also available from ProQuest, 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346, Telephone (734) 761-4700, http://www.proquest.com.

Subpart O—Ethylene Oxide Emissions Standards for Sterilization Facilities

§63.360 Applicability.

(a) All sterilization sources using 1 ton (see definition) in sterilization or fumigation operations are subject to the emissions standards in §63.362, except as specified in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section. Owners or operators of sources using 1 ton (see definition) subject to the provisions of this subpart must comply with the requirements of subpart A, of this part according to the applicability of subpart A of this part to such sources in Table 1 of this section.

Table 1 of Section 63.360 - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart O
ReferenceApplies to sources using 10 tons in subpart O aApplies to sources using 1 to 10 tons in subpart O aComment
a See definition.
63.1(a)(1) YesAdditional terms defined in §63.361; when overlap between subparts A and O occurs, subpart O takes precedence.
63.1(a)(2) Yes
63.1(a)(3) Yes
63.1(a)(4) Yes Subpart O clarifies the applicability of each paragraph in subpart A to sources subject to subpart O.
63.1(a)(5) NoReserved.
63.1(a)(6) Yes
63.1(a)(7) Yes
63.1.1(a)(8)Yes
63.1(a)(9)NoReserved.
63.1(a)(10) Yes
63.1(a)(11) Yes §63.366(a) of subpart O also allows report submissions via fax and on electronic media.
63.1(a)(12)-(14) Yes
63.1(b)(1)-(2) Yes
63.1(b)(3) No §63.367 clarifies the applicability of recordkeeping requirements for sources that determine they are not subject to the emissions standards.
63.1(c)(1) Yes Subpart O clarifies the applicability of each paragraph in subpart A to sources subject to subpart O in this table.
63.1(c)(2) Yes §63.360(f) exempts area sources subject to this subpart from the obligation to obtain Title V operating permits.
63.1(c)(3) NoReserved.
63.1(c)(4)Yes
63.1(c)(5) No §63.360 specifies applicability.
63.1(d) NoReserved.
63.1(e) Yes
63.2 YesAdditional terms defined in §63.361; when overlap between subparts A and O occurs, subpart O takes precedence.
63.3 YesOther units used in subpart O are defined in the text of subpart O.
63.4(a)(1)-(3) Yes
63.4(a)(4)NoReserved.
63.4(a)(5)Yes
63.4(b) Yes
63.4(c) Yes
63.5(a) No §63.366(b)(1) contains applicability requirements for constructed or reconstructed sources.
63.5(b)(1) YesNo
63.5(b)(2) NoReserved.
63.5(b)(3) NoSee §63.366(b)(2).
63.5(b)(4) YesNo
63.5(b)(5) YesNo
63.5(b)(6) YesNo
63.5(c) NoReserved.
63.5(d)(1)-(2) NoSee §63.366(b)(3).
63.5(d)(3)-(4) YesNo
63.5(e) YesNo
63.5(f)(1)-(2) NoSee §63.366(b)(4).
63.6(a)(1) Yes
63.6(a)(2) No §63.360 specifies applicability.
63.6(b)-(c) No §63.360(g) specifies compliance dates for sources.
63.6(d) NoReserved.
63.6(e) NoSubpart O does not contain any operation and maintenance plan requirements.
63.6(f)(1) No §63.362(b) specifies when the standards apply.
63.6(f)(2)(i) Yes
63.6(f)(2)(ii) No §63.363 specifies parameters for determining compliance.
63.6(f)(2)(iii)-(iv) Yes
63.6(f)(2)(v) No
63.6(f)(3) Yes
63.6(g) Yes
63.6(h) NoSubpart O does not contain any opacity or visible emission standards.
63.6(i)(1)-(14) Yes
63.6(i)(15) NoReserved
63.6(i)(16) Yes
63.6(j) Yes
63.7(a)(1) Yes
63.7(a)(2) Yes
63.7(a)(3) Yes
63.7(b) Yes
63.7(c) YesNo
63.7(d) YesNo
63.7(e) Yes §63.365 also contains test methods specific to sources subject to the emissions standards.
63.7(f) Yes
63.7(g)(1) Yes
63.7(g)(2) NoReserved
63.7(g)(3) Yes
63.7(h) Yes
63.8(a)(1) Yes
63.8(a)(2) Yes
63.8(a)(3) NoReserved
63.8(a)(4) Yes
63.8(b)(1) Yes
63.8(b)(2) Yes
63.8(b)(3) No
63.8(c)(1) (i)-(ii) NoA startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan is not required for these standards.
63.8(c)(1)(iii) Yes
63.8(c)(2)-(3) Yes
63.8(c)(4)-(5) NoFrequency of monitoring measurements is provided in §63.364; opacity monitors are not required for these standards.
63.8(c)(6) NoPerformance specifications for gas chromatographs and temperature monitors are contained in §63.365.
63.8(c)(7)(i)(A)-(B) NoPerformance specifications for gas chromatographs and temperature monitors are contained in §63.365.
63.8(c)(7)(i)(C) NoOpacity monitors are not required for these standards.
63.8(c)(7)(ii) NoPerformance specifications for gas chromatographs and temperature monitors are contained in §63.365.
63.8(c)(8) No
63.8(d) YesNo
63.8(e)(1) Yes
63.8(e)(2) Yes
63.8(e)(3) YesNo
63.8(e)(4) Yes
63.8(e)(5)(i) Yes
63.8(e)(5)(ii) NoOpacity monitors are not required for these standards.
63.8(f)(1)-(5) Yes
63.8(f)(6) No
63.8(g)(1) Yes
63.8(g)(2) No
63.8(g)(3)-(5) Yes
63.9(a) Yes
63.9(b)(1)-(i) Yes
63.9(b)(1)(ii)-(iii) No §63.366(c)(1)(i) contains language for sources that increase usage such that the source becomes subject to the emissions standards.
63.9(b)(2)-(3) Yes §63.366(c)(3) contains additional information to be included in the initial report for existing and new sources.
63.9(b)(4)-(5) No §63.366(c)(1)(ii) and (iii) contains requirements for new or reconstructed sources subject to the emissions standards.
63.9(c) Yes
63.9(d) No
63.9(e) Yes
63.9(f) NoOpacity monitors are not required for these standards.
63.9(g)(1) Yes
63.9(g)(2)-(3) NoOpacity monitors and relative accuracy testing are not required for these standards.
63.9(h)(1)-(3) Yes
63.9(h)(4) NoReserved.
63.9(h)(5) No §63.366(c)(2) instructs sources to submit actual data.
63.9(h)(6) Yes
63.9(i) Yes
63.9(j) Yes
63.10(a) Yes
63.10(b)(1) Yes
63.10(b)(2)(i) NoNot applicable due to batch nature of the industry.
63.10(b)(2)(ii) Yes
63.10(b)(2)(iii) No
63.10(b)(2)(iv)-(v) NoA startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan is not required for these standards.
63.10(b)(2)(vi)-(xii) Yes
63.10(b)(2)(xiii) No
63.10(b)(2)(xiv) Yes
63.10(b)(3) No §63.367 (b) and (c) contains applicability determination requirements.
63.10(c)(1) Yes
63.10(c)(2)-(4) NoReserved.
63.10(c)(5) Yes
63.10(c)(6) No
63.10(c)(7) NoNot applicable due to batch nature of the industry.
63.10(c)(8) Yes
63.10(c)(9) No
63.10(c)(10)-(13) Yes
63.10(c)(14) YesNo
63.10(c)(15) NoA startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan is not required for these standards.
63.10(d)(1) Yes
63.10(d)(2) Yes
63.10(d)(3) NoSubpart O does not contain opacity or visible emissions standards.
63.10(d)(4) Yes
63.10(d)(5) NoA startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan is not required for these standards.
63.10(e)(1) Yes
63.10(e)(2)(i) Yes
63.10(e)(2)(ii) NoOpacity monitors are not required for these standards.
63.10(e)(3)(i)-(iv) Yes
63.10(e)(3)(v) No §63.366(a)(3) specifies contents and submittal dates for excess emissions and monitoring system performance reports.
63.10(e)(3)(vi)-(viii) Yes
63.10(e)(4) NoOpacity monitors are not required for these standards.
63.10(f) Yes
63.11 Yes
63.12-63.15 Yes

(b) Sterilization sources using less than 1 ton (see definition) are not subject to the emissions standards in §63.362. The recordkeeping requirements of §63.367(c) apply.

(c) This subpart does not apply to beehive fumigators.

(d) This subpart does not apply to research or laboratory facilities as defined in section 112(c)(7) of title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

(e) This subpart does not apply to ethylene oxide sterilization operations at stationary sources such as hospitals, doctors offices, clinics, or other facilities whose primary purpose is to provide medical services to humans or animals.

(f) If you are an owner or operator of an area source subject to this subpart, you are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a) or 71.3(a) for a reason other than your status as an area source under this subpart. Notwithstanding the previous sentence, you must continue to comply with the provisions of this subpart applicable to area sources.

(g) The owner or operator shall comply with the provisions of this subpart as follows:

(1) All sterilization chamber vents subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 with an initial startup date before December 6, 1998, no later than December 6, 1998.

(2) All sterilization chamber vents subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 with an initial startup date on or after December 6, 1998, immediately upon initial startup of the source.

(3) All sterilization chamber vents at sources using less than 1 ton of ethylene oxide that increase their ethylene oxide usage after December 6, 1998 such that the sterilization chamber vent becomes subject to the emissions standards in §63.362(c), immediately upon becoming subject to the emission standards.

(4) All aeration room vents subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 with an initial startup date before December 6, 2000, no later than December 6, 2000.

(5) All aeration room vents subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 with an initial startup date on or after December 6, 2000, immediately upon initial startup of the source.

(6) All aeration room vents at sources using less than 10 tons that increase their ethylene oxide usage after December 6, 2000, such that the aeration room vents become subject to the emissions standards in §63.362, immediately upon becoming subject to the emission standards.

(7)-(10) [Reserved]

§63.361 Definitions.

Terms and nomenclature used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act (the Act) as amended in 1990, §§63.2 and 63.3 of subpart A of this part, or in this section. For the purposes of subpart O, if the same term is defined in subpart A and in this section, it shall have the meaning given in this section.

Aeration room means any vessel or room that is used to facilitate off-gassing of ethylene oxide at a sterilization facility.

Aeration room vent means the point(s) through which the evacuation of ethylene oxide-laden air from an aeration room occurs.

Baseline temperature means a minimum temperature at the outlet from the catalyst bed of a catalytic oxidation control device or at the exhaust point from the combustion chamber of a thermal oxidation control device.

Chamber exhaust vent means the point(s) through which ethylene oxide-laden air is removed from the sterilization chamber during chamber unloading following the completion of sterilization and associated air washes.

Compliance date means the date by which a source subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 is required to be in compliance with the standard.

Deviation means any instance in which an affected source, subject to this subpart, or an owner or operator of such a source:

(1) Fails to meet any requirement or obligation established by this subpart including, but not limited to, any emission limitation (including any operating limit) or work practice standard;

(2) Fails to meet any term or condition that is adopted to implement an applicable requirement in this subpart and that is included in the operating permit for any affected source required to obtain such a permit; or

(3) Fails to meet any emission limitation (including any operating limit) or work practice standard in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction, regardless of whether or not such failure is permitted by this subpart.

Effective date means the date of promulgation in the Federal Register notice.

Initial startup date means the date when a source subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 first begins operation of a sterilization process.

Manifolding emissions means combining ethylene oxide emissions from two or more different vent types for the purpose of controlling these emissions with a single control device.

Maximum ethylene glycol concentration means any concentration of ethylene glycol in the scrubber liquor of an acid-water scrubber control device established during a performance test when the scrubber achieves at least 99-percent control of ethylene oxide emissions.

Maximum liquor tank level means any level of scrubber liquor in the acid-water scrubber liquor recirculation tank established during a performance test when the scrubber achieves at least 99-percent control of ethylene oxide emissions.

Oxidation temperature means the temperature at the outlet point of a catalytic oxidation unit control device or at the exhaust point from the combustion chamber for a thermal oxidation unit control device.

Source(s) using less than 1 ton means source(s) using less than 907 kg (1 ton) of ethylene oxide within all consecutive 12-month periods after December 6, 1996.

Source(s) using 1 ton means source(s) using 907 kg (1 ton) or more of ethylene oxide within any consecutive 12-month period after December 6, 1996.

Source(s) using 1 to 10 tons means source(s) using 907 kg (1 ton) or more of ethylene oxide in any consecutive 12-month period but less than 9,070 kg (10 tons) of ethylene oxide in all consecutive 12-month periods after December 6, 1996.

Source(s) using less than 10 tons means source(s) using less than 9,070 kg (10 tons) of ethylene oxide in all consecutive 12-month periods after December 6, 1996.

Source(s) using 10 tons means source(s) using 9,070 kg (10 tons) or more of ethylene oxide in any consecutive 12-month period after December 6, 1996.

Sterilization chamber means any enclosed vessel or room that is filled with ethylene oxide gas, or an ethylene oxide/inert gas mixture, for the purpose of sterilizing and/or fumigating at a sterilization facility.

Sterilization chamber vent means the point (prior to the vacuum pump) through which the evacuation of ethylene oxide from the sterilization chamber occurs following sterilization or fumigation, including any subsequent air washes.

Sterilization facility means any stationary source where ethylene oxide is used in the sterilization or fumigation of materials.

Sterilization operation means any time when ethylene oxide is removed from the sterilization chamber through the sterilization chamber vent or the chamber exhaust vent or when ethylene oxide is removed from the aeration room through the aeration room vent.

Thermal oxidizer means all combustion devices except flares.

§63.362 Standards.

(a) Each owner or operator of a source subject to the provisions of this subpart shall comply with these requirements on and after the compliance date specified in §63.360(g). The standards of this section are summarized in Table 1 of this section.

Table 1 of Section 63.362 - Standards for Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilizers and Fumigators
Existing and new sourcesSource typeSterilization chamber ventAeration room ventChamber exhaust vent
Source size<907 kg (<1 ton)No control required; minimal recordkeeping requirements apply (see §63.367(c)).
≥907 kg and <9,070 kg (≥1 ton and <10 tons)99% emission reduction (see §63.362(c))No controlNo control.
≥9,070 kg (≥10 tons)99% emission reduction (see §63.362(c))1 ppm maximum outlet concentration or 99% emission reduction (see §63.362(d))No control.

(b) Applicability of emission limits. The emission limitations of paragraphs (c), (d), and (e) of this section apply during sterilization operation. The emission limitations do not apply during periods of malfunction.

(c) Sterilization chamber vent at sources using 1 ton. Each owner or operator of a sterilization source using 1 ton shall reduce ethylene oxide emissions to the atmosphere by at least 99 percent from each sterilization chamber vent.

(d) Aeration room vent at sources using 10 tons. Each owner or operator of a sterilization source using 10 tons shall reduce ethylene oxide emissions to the atmosphere from each aeration room vent to a maximum concentration of 1 ppmv or by at least 99 percent, whichever is less stringent, from each aeration room vent.

(e) [Reserved]

§63.363 Compliance and performance provisions.

(a)(1) The owner or operator of a source subject to emissions standards in §63.362 shall conduct an initial performance test using the procedures listed in §63.7 according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360, the procedures listed in this section, and the test methods listed in §63.365.

(2) The owner or operator of all sources subject to these emissions standards shall complete the performance test within 180 days after the compliance date for the specific source as determined in §63.360(g).

(b) The procedures in paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section shall be used to determine initial compliance with the emission limits under §63.362(c), the sterilization chamber vent standard and to establish operating limits for the control devices:

(1) The owner or operator shall determine the efficiency of control devices used to comply with §63.362(c) using the test methods and procedures in §63.365(b).

(2) For facilities with acid-water scrubbers, the owner or operator shall establish as an operating limit either:

(i) The maximum ethylene glycol concentration using the procedures described in §63.365(e)(1); or

(ii) The maximum liquor tank level using the procedures described in §63.365(e)(2).

(3) For facilities with catalytic oxidizers or thermal oxidizers, the operating limit consists of the recommended minimum oxidation temperature provided by the oxidation unit manufacturer for an operating limit.

(4) Facilities with catalytic oxidizers shall comply with one of the following work practices:

(i) Once per year after the initial compliance test, conduct a performance test during routine operations, i.e., with product in the chamber using the procedures described in §63.365(b) or (d) as appropriate. If the percent efficiency is less than 99 percent, restore the catalyst as soon as practicable but no later than 180 days after conducting the performance test; or

(ii) Once per year after the initial compliance test, analyze ethylene oxide concentration data from §63.364(e) or a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) and restore the catalyst as soon as practicable but no later than 180 days after data analysis; or,

(iii) Every 5 years, beginning 5 years after the initial compliance test (or by December 6, 2002, whichever is later), replace the catalyst bed with new catalyst material.

(c) The procedures in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section shall be used to determine initial compliance with the emission limits under §63.362(d), the aeration room vent standard:

(1) The owner or operator shall comply with either paragraph (b)(2) or (3) of this section.

(2) Determine the concentration of ethylene oxide emitted from the aeration room into the atmosphere (after any control device used to comply with §63.362(d)) using the methods in §63.365(c)(1); or

(3) Determine the efficiency of the control device used to comply with §63.362(d) using the test methods and procedures in §63.365(d)(2).

(d) [Reserved]

(e) For facilities complying with the emissions limits under §63.362 with a control technology other than acid-water scrubbers or catalytic or thermal oxidizers, the owner or operator of the facility shall provide to the Administrator or delegated authority information describing the design and operation of the air pollution control system, including recommendations for the operating parameters to be monitored to demonstrate continuous compliance. Based on this information, the Administrator will determine the operating parameter(s) to be measured during the performance test. During the performance test required in paragraph (a) of this section, using the methods approved in §63.365(g), the owner or operator shall determine the site-specific operating limit(s)for the operating parameters approved by the Administrator.

(f) A facility must demonstrate continuous compliance with each operating limit and work practice standard required under this section, except during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction, according to the methods specified in §63.364.

§63.364 Monitoring requirements.

(a)(1) The owner or operator of a source subject to emissions standards in §63.362 shall comply with the monitoring requirements in §63.8 of subpart A of this part, according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360, and in this section.

(2) Each owner or operator of an ethylene oxide sterilization facility subject to these emissions standards shall monitor the parameters specified in this section. All monitoring equipment shall be installed such that representative measurements of emissions or process parameters from the source are obtained. For monitoring equipment purchased from a vendor, verification of the operational status of the monitoring equipment shall include completion of the manufacturer's written specifications or recommendations for installation, operation, and calibration of the system.

(b) For sterilization facilities complying with §63.363(b) or (d) through the use of an acid-water scrubber, the owner or operator shall either:

(1) Sample the scrubber liquor and analyze and record once per week the ethylene glycol concentration of the scrubber liquor using the test methods and procedures in §63.365(e)(1). Monitoring is required during a week only if the scrubber unit has been operated; or

(2) Measure and record once per week the level of the scrubber liquor in the recirculation tank. The owner or operator shall install, maintain, and use a liquid level indicator to measure the scrubber liquor tank level (i.e., a marker on the tank wall, a dipstick, a magnetic indicator, etc.). Monitoring is required during a week only if the scrubber unit has been operated.

(c) For sterilization facilities complying with §63.363(b) or (c) through the use of catalytic oxidation or thermal oxidation, the owner or operator shall either comply with §63.364(e) or continuously monitor and record the oxidation temperature at the outlet to the catalyst bed or at the exhaust point from the thermal combustion chamber using the temperature monitor described in paragraph (c)(4) of this section. Monitoring is required only when the oxidation unit is operated. From 15-minute or shorter period temperature values, a data acquisition system for the temperature monitor shall compute and record a daily average oxidation temperature. Strip chart data shall be converted to record a daily average oxidation temperature each day any instantaneous temperature recording falls below the minimum temperature.

(1)-(3) [Reserved]

(4) The owner or operator shall install, calibrate, operate, and maintain a temperature monitor accurate to within ±5.6°C (±10°F) to measure the oxidation temperature. The owner or operator shall verify the accuracy of the temperature monitor twice each calendar year with a reference temperature monitor (traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards or an independent temperature measurement device dedicated for this purpose). During accuracy checking, the probe of the reference device shall be at the same location as that of the temperature monitor being tested. As an alternative, the accuracy temperature monitor may be verified in a calibrated oven (traceable to NIST standards).

(d) For sterilization facilities complying with §63.363(b) or (c) through the use of a control device other than acid-water scrubbers or catalytic or thermal oxidizers, the owner or operator shall monitor the parameters as approved by the Administrator using the methods and procedures in §63.365(g).

(e) Measure and record once per hour the ethylene oxide concentration at the outlet to the atmosphere after any control device according to the procedures specified in §63.365(c)(1). The owner or operator shall compute and record a 24-hour average daily. The owner or operator will install, calibrate, operate, and maintain a monitor consistent with the requirements of performance specification (PS) 8 or 9 in 40 CFR part 60, appendix B, to measure ethylene oxide. The daily calibration requirements of section 7.2 of PS-9 or Section 13.1 of PS-8 are required only on days when ethylene oxide emissions are vented to the control device.

(f) [Reserved]

§63.365 Test methods and procedures.

(a) Performance testing. The owner or operator of a source subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 shall comply with the performance testing requirements in §63.7 of subpart A of this part, according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360, and in this section.

(b) Efficiency at the sterilization chamber vent. California Air Resources Board (CARB) Method 431 or the following procedures shall be used to determine the efficiency of all types of control devices used to comply with §63.362(c), sterilization chamber vent standard.

(1) First evacuation of the sterilization chamber. These procedures shall be performed on an empty sterilization chamber, charged with a typical amount of ethylene oxide, for the duration of the first evacuation under normal operating conditions (i.e., sterilization pressure and temperature).

(i) The amount of ethylene oxide loaded into the sterilizer (Wc) shall be determined by either:

(A) Weighing the ethylene oxide gas cylinder(s) used to charge the sterilizer before and after charging. Record these weights to the nearest 45 g (0.1 lb). Multiply the total mass of gas charged by the weight percent ethylene oxide present in the gas.

(B) Installing calibrated rotameters at the sterilizer inlet and measuring flow rate and duration of sterilizer charge. Use the following equation to convert flow rate to weight of ethylene oxide:



where:

Wc = weight of ethylene oxide charged, g (lb)

Fv = volumetric flow rate, liters per minute (L/min) corrected to 20°C and 101.325 kilopascals (kPa) (scf per minute (scfm) corrected to 68°F and 1 atmosphere of pressure (atm)); the flowrate must be constant during time (t)

t = time, min

%EOV = volume fraction ethylene oxide

SV = standard volume, 24.05 liters per mole (L/mole) = 22.414 L/mole ideal gas law constant corrected to 20°C and 101.325 kPa (385.32 scf per mole (scf/mole) = 359 scf/mole ideal gas law constant corrected to 68°F and 1 atm).

MW = molecular weight of ethylene oxide, 44.05 grams per gram-mole (g/g-mole) (44.05 pounds per pound-mole (lb/lb-mole)), or

(C) Calculating the mass based on the conditions of the chamber immediately after it has been charged using the following equation:



where:

P = chamber pressure, kPa (psia)

V = chamber volume, liters (L) (ft 3)

R = gas constant, 8.313 L·kPa/g-mole·(10.73 psia·ft 3/mole°R)

T = temperature, K (°R)

Note:

If the ethylene oxide concentration is in weight percent, use the following equation to calculate mole fraction:



where:

WEO = weight percent of ethylene oxide

Wx = weight percent of compound in the balance of the mixture

MWx = molecular weight of compound in the balance gas mixture

(ii) The residual mass of ethylene oxide in the sterilizer shall be determined by recording the chamber temperature, pressure, and volume after the completion of the first evacuation and using the following equation:



where:

Wr = weight of ethylene oxide remaining in chamber (after the first evacuation), in g (lb)

(iii) Calculate the total mass of ethylene oxide at the inlet to the control device (Wi) by subtracting the residual mass (Wr) calculated in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section from the charged weight (Wc) calculated in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section.

(iv) The mass of ethylene oxide emitted from the control device outlet (Wo) shall be calculated by continuously monitoring the flow rate and concentration using the following procedure.

(A) Measure the flow rate through the control device exhaust continuously during the first evacuation using the procedure found in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, Test Methods 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D, as appropriate. (Method 2D (using orifice plates or Rootstype meters) is recommended for measuring flow rates from sterilizer control devices.) Record the flow rate at 1-minute intervals throughout the test cycle, taking the first reading within 15 seconds after time zero. Time zero is defined as the moment when the pressure in the sterilizer is released. Correct the flow to standard conditions (20°C and 101.325 kPa (68°F and 1 atm)) and determine the flow rate for the run as outlined in the test methods listed in paragraph (b) of this section.

(B) Test Method 18 or 25A, 40 CFR part 60, appendix A (hereafter referred to as Method 18 or 25A, respectively), shall be used to measure the concentration of ethylene oxide.

(1) Prepare a graph of volumetric flow rate versus time corresponding to the period of the run cycle. Integrate the area under the curve to determine the volume.

(2) Calculate the mass of ethylene oxide by using the following equation:



Where:

Wo = Mass of ethylene oxide, g (lb)

C = concentration of ethylene oxide in ppmv

V = volume of gas exiting the control device corrected to standard conditions, L (ft 3)

1/10 6 = correction factor LEO/10 6 LTOTAL GAS (ft 3EO/10 6 ft 3TOTAL GAS)

(3) Calculate the efficiency by the equation in paragraph (b)(1)(v) of this section.

(C) [Reserved]

(v) Determine control device efficiency (% Eff) using the following equation:



where:

% Eff = percent efficiency

Wi = mass flow rate into the control device

Wo = mass flow rate out of the control device

(vi) Repeat the procedures in paragraphs (b)(1) (i) through (v) of this section three times. The arithmetic average percent efficiency of the three runs shall determine the overall efficiency of the control device.

(2) [Reserved]

(c) Concentration determination. The following procedures shall be used to determine the ethylene oxide concentration.

(1) Parameter monitoring. For determining the ethylene oxide concentration required in §63.364(e), follow the procedures in PS 8 or PS 9 in 40 CFR part 60, appendix B. Sources complying with PS 8 are exempt from the relative accuracy procedures in sections 2.4 and 3 of PS-8.

(2) Initial compliance. For determining the ethylene oxide concentration required in §63.363(c)(2), the procedures outlined in Method 18 or Method 25 A (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) shall be used. A Method 18 or Method 25A test consists of three 1-hour runs. If using Method 25A to determine concentration, calibrate and report Method 25A instrument results using ethylene oxide as the calibration gas. The arithmetic average of the ethylene oxide concentration of the three test runs shall determine the overall outlet ethylene oxide concentration from the control device.

(d) Efficiency determination at the aeration room vent (not manifolded). The following procedures shall be used to determine the efficiency of a control device used to comply with §63.362(d), the aeration room vent standard.

(1) Determine the concentration of ethylene oxide at the inlet and outlet of the control device using the procedures in Method 18 or 25A in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. A test is comprised of three 1-hour runs.

(2) Determine control device efficiency (% Eff) using the following equation:



Where:

% Eff = percent efficiency

Wi = mass flow rate into the control device

WO = mass flow rate out of the control device

(3) Repeat the procedures in paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section three times. The arithmetic average percent efficiency of the three runs shall determine the overall efficiency of the control device.

(e) Determination of baseline parameters for acid-water scrubbers. The procedures in this paragraph shall be used to determine the monitored parameters established in §63.363(b), (d), or (e) for acid-water scrubbers and to monitor the parameters as established in §63.364(b).

(1) Ethylene glycol concentration. For determining the ethylene glycol concentration, the facility owner or operator shall establish the maximum ethylene glycol concentration as the ethylene glycol concentration averaged over three test runs; the sampling and analysis procedures in ASTM D 3695-88, Standard Test Method for Volatile Alcohols in Water By Direct Aqueous-Injection Gas Chromatography, (incorporated by reference - see §63.14) shall be used to determine the ethylene glycol concentration.

(2) Scrubber liquor tank level. For determining the scrubber liquor tank level, the sterilization facility owner or operator shall establish the maximum liquor tank level based on a single measurement of the liquor tank level during one test run.

(f) [Reserved]

(g) An owner or operator of a sterilization facility seeking to demonstrate compliance with the standards found at §63.362(c), (d), or (e) with a control device other than an acid-water scrubber or catalytic or thermal oxidation unit shall provide to the Administrator the information requested under §63.363(f). The owner or operator shall submit: a description of the device; test results collected in accordance with §63.363(f) verifying the performance of the device for controlling ethylene oxide emissions to the atmosphere to the levels required by the applicable standards; the appropriate operating parameters that will be monitored; and the frequency of measuring and recording to establish continuous compliance with the standards. The monitoring plan submitted identifying the compliance monitoring is subject to the Administrator's approval. The owner or operator of the sterilization facility shall install, calibrate, operate, and maintain the monitor(s) approved by the Administrator based on the information submitted by the owner or operator. The owner or operator shall include in the information submitted to the Administrator proposed performance specifications and quality assurance procedures for their monitors. The Administrator may request further information and shall approve appropriate test methods and procedures.

(h) An owner or operator of a sterilization facility seeking to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of §63.363 or §">63.364, with a monitoring device or procedure other than a gas chromatograph or a flame ionization analyzer, shall provide to the Administrator information describing the operation of the monitoring device or procedure and the parameter(s) that would demonstrate continuous compliance with each operating limit. The Administrator may request further information and will specify appropriate test methods and procedures.

§63.366 Reporting requirements.

(a) The owner or operator of a source subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 shall fulfill all reporting requirements in §§63.10(a), (d), (e), and (f) of subpart A, according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360. These reports will be made to the Administrator at the appropriate address identified in §63.13 of subpart A of this part.

(1) Reports required by subpart A and this section may be sent by U.S. mail, fax, or by another courier.

(i) Submittals sent by U.S. mail shall be postmarked on or before the specified date.

(ii) Submittals sent by other methods shall be received by the Administrator on or before the specified date.

(2) If acceptable to both the Administrator and the owner or operator of a source, reports may be submitted on electronic media.

(3) Content and submittal dates for deviations and monitoring system performance reports. All deviations and monitoring system performance reports and all summary reports, if required per §63.10(e)(3)(vii) and (viii), shall be delivered or postmarked within 30 days following the end of each calendar half or quarter as appropriate (see §63.10(e)(3)(i) through (iv) for applicability). Written reports of deviations from an operating limit shall include all information required in §63.10(c)(5) through (13), as applicable in Table 1 of §63.360, and information from any calibration tests in which the monitoring equipment is not in compliance with PS 9 or the method used for temperature calibration. The written report shall also include the name, title, and signature of the responsible official who is certifying the accuracy of the report. When no deviations have occurred or monitoring equipment has not been inoperative, repaired, or adjusted, such information shall be stated in the report.

(b) Construction and reconstruction. The owner or operator of each source using 10 tons shall fulfill all requirements for construction or reconstruction of a source in §63.5 of subpart A of this part, according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360, and in this paragraph.

(1) Applicability.(i) This paragraph and §63.5 of subpart A of this part implement the preconstruction review requirements of section 112(i)(1) for sources subject to these emissions standards. In addition, this paragraph and §63.5 of subpart A of this part include other requirements for constructed and reconstructed sources that are or become subject to these emissions standards.

(ii) After the effective date, the requirements in this section and in §63.5 of subpart A of this part apply to owners or operators who construct a new source or reconstruct a source subject to these emissions standards after December 6, 1994. New or reconstructed sources subject to these emissions standards with an initial startup date before the effective date are not subject to the preconstruction review requirements specified in paragraphs (b) (2) and (3) of this section and §63.5(d) (3) and (4) and (e) of subpart A of this part.

(2) After the effective date, whether or not an approved permit program is effective in the State in which a source is (or would be) located, no person may construct a new source or reconstruct a source subject to these emissions standards, or reconstruct a source such that the source becomes a source subject to these emissions standards, without obtaining advance written approval from the Administrator in accordance with the procedures specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section and §63.5(d) (3) and (4) and (e) of subpart A of this part.

(3) Application for approval of construction or reconstruction. The provisions of paragraph (b)(3) of this section and §63.5(d) (3) and (4) of subpart A of this part implement section 112(i)(1) of the Act.

(i) General application requirements.(A) An owner or operator who is subject to the requirements of paragraph (b)(2) of this section shall submit to the Administrator an application for approval of the construction of a new source subject to these emissions standards, the reconstruction of a source subject to these emissions standards, or the reconstruction of a source such that the source becomes a source subject to these emissions standards. The application shall be submitted as soon as practicable before the construction or reconstruction is planned to commence (but not sooner than the effective date) if the construction or reconstruction commences after the effective date. The application shall be submitted as soon as practicable before the initial startup date but no later than 60 days after the effective date if the construction or reconstruction had commenced and the initial startup date had not occurred before the effective date. The application for approval of construction or reconstruction may be used to fulfill the initial notification requirements of paragraph (c)(1)(iii) of this section. The owner or operator may submit the application for approval well in advance of the date construction or reconstruction is planned to commence in order to ensure a timely review by the Administrator and that the planned commencement date will not be delayed.

(B) A separate application shall be submitted for each construction or reconstruction. Each application for approval of construction or reconstruction shall include at a minimum:

(1) The applicant's name and address.

(2) A notification of intention to construct a new source subject to these emissions standards or make any physical or operational change to a source subject to these emissions standards that may meet or has been determined to meet the criteria for a reconstruction, as defined in §63.2 of subpart A of this part.

(3) The address (i.e., physical location) or proposed address of the source.

(4) An identification of the relevant standard that is the basis of the application.

(5) The expected commencement date of the construction or reconstruction.

(6) The expected completion date of the construction or reconstruction.

(7) The anticipated date of (initial) startup of the source.

(8) The type and quantity of hazardous air pollutants emitted by the source, reported in units and averaging times and in accordance with the test methods specified in the standard, or if actual emissions data are not yet available, an estimate of the type and quantity of hazardous air pollutants expected to be emitted by the source reported in units and averaging times specified. The owner or operator may submit percent reduction information, if the standard is established in terms of percent reduction. However, operating parameters, such as flow rate, shall be included in the submission to the extent that they demonstrate performance and compliance.

(9) Other information as specified in paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section and §63.5(d)(3) of subpart A of this part.

(C) An owner or operator who submits estimates or preliminary information in place of the actual emissions data and analysis required in paragraphs (b)(3)(i)(B)(8) and (ii) of this section shall submit the actual, measured emissions data and other correct information as soon as available but no later than with the notification of compliance status required in paragraph (c)(2) of this section.

(ii) Application for approval of construction. Each application for approval of construction shall include, in addition to the information required in paragraph (b)(3)(i)(B) of this section, technical information describing the proposed nature, size, design, operating design capacity, and method of operation of the source subject to these emissions standards, including an identification of each point of emission for each hazardous air pollutant that is emitted (or could be emitted) and a description of the planned air pollution control system (equipment or method) for each emission point. The description of the equipment to be used for the control of emissions shall include each control device for each hazardous air pollutant and the estimated control efficiency (percent) for each control device. The description of the method to be used for the control of emissions shall include an estimated control efficiency (percent) for that method. Such technical information shall include calculations of emission estimates in sufficient detail to permit assessment of the validity of the calculations. An owner or operator who submits approximations of control efficiencies under paragraph (b)(3) of this section shall submit the actual control efficiencies as specified in paragraph (b)(3)(i)(C) of this section.

(4) Approval of construction or reconstruction based on prior State preconstruction review. (i) The Administrator may approve an application for construction or reconstruction specified in paragraphs (b)(2) and (3) of this section and §63.5(d)(3) and (4) of subpart A of this part if the owner or operator of a new or reconstructed source who is subject to such requirement demonstrates to the Administrator's satisfaction that the following conditions have been (or will be) met:

(A) The owner or operator of the new or reconstructed source subject to these emissions standards has undergone a preconstruction review and approval process in the State in which the source is (or would be) located before the effective date and has received a federally enforceable construction permit that contains a finding that the source will meet these emissions standards as proposed, if the source is properly built and operated;

(B) In making its finding, the State has considered factors substantially equivalent to those specified in §63.5(e)(1) of subpart A of this part.

(ii) The owner or operator shall submit to the Administrator the request for approval of construction or reconstruction no later than the application deadline specified in paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section. The owner or operator shall include in the request information sufficient for the Administrator's determination. The Administrator will evaluate the owner or operator's request in accordance with the procedures specified in §63.5 of subpart A of this part. The Administrator may request additional relevant information after the submittal of a request for approval of construction or reconstruction.

(c) Notification requirements. The owner or operator of each source subject to the emissions standards in §63.362 shall fulfill all notification requirements in §63.9 of subpart A of this part, according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360, and in this paragraph.

(1) Initial notifications. (i)(A) If a source that otherwise would be subject to these emissions standards subsequently increases its use of ethylene oxide within any consecutive 12-month period after December 6, 1996, such that the source becomes subject to these emissions standards or other requirements, such source shall be subject to the notification requirements of §63.9 of subpart A of this part.

(B) Sources subject to these emissions standards may use the application for approval of construction or reconstruction under paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section and §63.5(d) (3) of subpart A of this part, respectively, if relevant to fulfill the initial notification requirements.

(ii) The owner or operator of a new or reconstructed source subject to these emissions standards that has an initial startup date after the effective date and for which an application for approval of construction or reconstruction is required under paragraph (b)(3) of this section and §63.5(d) (3) and (4) of subpart A of this part shall provide the following information in writing to the Administrator:

(A) A notification of intention to construct a new source subject to these emissions standards, reconstruct a source subject to these emissions standards, or reconstruct a source such that the source becomes a source subject to these emissions standards with the application for approval of construction or reconstruction as specified in paragraph (b)(3)(i)(A) of this section;

(B) A notification of the date when construction or reconstruction was commenced, submitted simultaneously with the application for approval of construction or reconstruction, if construction or reconstruction was commenced before the effective date of these standards;

(C) A notification of the date when construction or reconstruction was commenced, delivered or postmarked not later than 30 days after such date, if construction or reconstruction was commenced after the effective date of these standards;

(D) A notification of the anticipated date of startup of the source, delivered or postmarked not more than 60 days nor less than 30 days before such date; and

(E) A notification of the actual date of initial startup of the source, delivered or postmarked within 15 calendar days after that date.

(iii) After the effective date, whether or not an approved permit program is effective in the State in which a source subject to these emissions standards is (or would be) located, an owner or operator who intends to construct a new source subject to these emissions standards or reconstruct a source subject to these emissions standards, or reconstruct a source such that it becomes a source subject to these emissions standards, shall notify the Administrator in writing of the intended construction or reconstruction. The notification shall be submitted as soon as practicable before the construction or reconstruction is planned to commence (but no sooner than the effective date of these standards) if the construction or reconstruction commences after the effective date of the standard. The notification shall be submitted as soon as practicable before the initial startup date but no later than 60 days after the effective date of this standard if the construction or reconstruction had commenced and the initial startup date has not occurred before the standard's effective date. The notification shall include all the information required for an application for approval of construction or reconstruction as specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section and §63.5(d)(3) and (4) of subpart A of this part. For sources subject to these emissions standards, the application for approval of construction or reconstruction may be used to fulfill the initial notification requirements of §63.9 of subpart A of this part.

(2) If an owner or operator of a source subject to these emissions standards submits estimates or preliminary information in the application for approval of construction or reconstruction required in paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section and §63.5(d)(3) of subpart A of this part, respectively, in place of the actual emissions data or control efficiencies required in paragraphs (b)(3)(i)(B)(8) and (ii) of this section, the owner or operator shall submit the actual emissions data and other correct information as soon as available but no later than with the initial notification of compliance status.

(3) The owner or operator of any existing sterilization facility subject to this subpart shall also include the amount of ethylene oxide used during the previous consecutive 12-month period in the initial notification report required by §63.9(b)(2) and (3) of subpart A of this part. For new sterilization facilities subject to this subpart, the amount of ethylene oxide used shall be an estimate of expected use during the first consecutive 12-month period of operation.

§63.367 Recordkeeping requirements.

(a) The owner or operator of a source subject to §63.362 shall comply with the recordkeeping requirements in §63.10(b) and (c), according to the applicability in Table 1 of §63.360, and in this section. All records required to be maintained by this subpart or a subpart referenced by this subpart shall be maintained in such a manner that they can be readily accessed and are suitable for inspection. The most recent 2 years of records shall be retained onsite or shall be accessible to an inspector while onsite. The records of the preceding 3 years, where required, may be retained offsite. Records may be maintained in hard copy or computer-readable form including, but not limited to, on paper, microfilm, computer, computer disk, magnetic tape, or microfiche.

(b) The owners or operators of a source using 1 to 10 tons not subject to §63.362 shall maintain records of ethylene oxide use on a 12-month rolling average basis (until the source changes its operations to become a source subject to §63.362).

(c) The owners or operators of a source using less than 1 ton shall maintain records of ethylene oxide use on a 12-month rolling average basis (until the source changes its operations to become a source subject to §63.362).

(d) The owners or operators complying with §63.363(b) (4) shall maintain records of the compliance test, data analysis, and if catalyst is replaced, proof of replacement.

§63.368 Implementation and enforcement.

(a) This subpart can be implemented and enforced by the U.S. EPA, or a delegated authority such as the applicable State, local, or Tribal agency. If the U.S. EPA Administrator has delegated authority to a State, local, or Tribal agency, then that agency, in addition to the U.S. EPA, has the authority to implement and enforce this subpart. Contact the applicable U.S. EPA Regional Office to find out if implementation and enforcement of this subpart is delegated to a State, local, or Tribal agency.

(b) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority of this subpart to a State, local, or Tribal agency under subpart E of this part, the authorities contained in paragraph (c) of this section are retained by the Administrator of U.S. EPA and cannot be transferred to the State, local, or Tribal agency.

(c) The authorities that cannot be delegated to State, local, or Tribal agencies are as specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) Approval of alternatives to the requirements in §§63.360 and 63.362.

(2) Approval of major alternatives to test methods under §63.7(e)(2)(ii) and (f), as defined in §63.90, and as required in this subpart.

(3) Approval of major alternatives to monitoring under §63.8(f), as defined in §63.90, and as required in this subpart.

(4) Approval of major alternatives to recordkeeping and reporting under §63.10(f), as defined in §63.90, and as required in this subpart.

Facility Response Plans: Hope for the best, prepare for the worst-case discharges
2024-04-05T05:00:00Z

Facility Response Plans: Hope for the best, prepare for the worst-case discharges

“What’s the worst that could happen?” You’ve likely heard and have even asked this rhetorical question. Under the Clean Water Act (CWA), it’s no longer rhetorical; it’s now a regulatory question that must be answered with formal, written plans by facilities that could discharge dangerous chemicals into nearby waterbodies.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a rule (codified at 40 CFR Part 118) that requires certain facilities to develop and submit Facility Response Plans (FRPs) for worst-case discharges or the potential for worst-case discharges of CWA hazardous substances into navigable water.

Use this article to help you determine whether your facility is covered by the CWA hazardous substance FRP requirements.

First, review the terms.

The final rule covers “onshore, non-transportation-related facilities that could reasonably be expected to cause substantial harm to the environment by discharging a CWA hazardous substance into or on the navigable waters, adjoining shorelines, or exclusive economic zone.” As with all other regulations, the definitions of the terms determine what the rules mean and what they require.

  • Adverse weather refers to weather conditions that make it difficult for response equipment and personnel to clean up or respond to discharged CWA hazardous substances.
  • All CWA hazardous substances are listed at 116.4. The CWA hazardous substances with their corresponding reportable quantities are listed at 117.3.
  • The maximum quantity on-site refers to the maximum total aggregate quantity for each CWA hazardous substance present within the facility at any time.
  • Navigable waters are waters of the United States as defined at 120.2.
  • Public receptors include public spaces inhabited, occupied, or used by the public at any time where a worst-case discharge into or on the navigable waters or a conveyance (i.e., means of transport) to navigable waters could injure members of the public.
  • A worst-case discharge is the largest foreseeable discharge in adverse weather conditions, including a discharge resulting from fire or explosion.

Second, look at the applicability criteria.

A facility considered to pose substantial harm must meet three conditions. The CWA hazardous substance FRP requirements apply to facilities that:

  • Have a maximum quantity on-site of any CWA hazardous substance 1,000 times or more than the reportable quantity listed at 117.3;
  • Are within a 0.5-mile radius of navigable waters or a conveyance to navigable waters; and
  • Meet one or more substantial harm criteria, including:
    • The ability to cause injury to fish, wildlife, and sensitive environments;
    • The ability to adversely impact a public water system;
    • The ability to cause injury to public receptors; or
    • The history of a CWA hazardous substance discharge above the reportable quantity that reached navigable water within the last five years.

The final rule requires facilities to model worst-case discharge scenarios that represent each covered CWA hazardous substance. Through these scenarios, facilities determine whether they meet the first three substantial harm criteria above.

Third, check the exceptions and exemptions.

Determine whether your facility qualifies for any exceptions or exemptions to the FRP requirements listed at 118.8.

Exceptions include:

  • Facilities not reasonably expected to pose substantial harm based solely on location (excluding man-made structures designed to prevent a discharge);
  • Equipment, vessels, or transportation-related facilities subject to other federal authorities, such as the Department of Transportation; and
  • Underground storage tanks (USTs) and connected underground piping, equipment, and containment systems subject to UST regulations.

Exemptions apply to:

  • CWA hazardous substances contained in articles (which are excluded from calculations of the maximum quantity on-site); and
  • Certain uses, such as for processing or cooling water.

If your facility meets the applicability criteria and doesn’t qualify for any exceptions or exemptions, it’s subject to the CWA hazardous substance FRP requirements. You must prepare, submit to EPA, and implement an FRP.

Covered facilities must submit FRPs to EPA within three years of May 28, 2024 (the effective date of the rule).

Fourth, keep these tips in mind.

  • When calculating the quantity of CWA hazardous substances at your site, use the table at 117.3 since it contains the reportable quantities. The tables at 116.4 only list the covered substances.
  • Don’t forget to include mixtures! The standards at 118.9 explain how to handle CWA hazardous substances contained in mixtures when calculating your facility’s maximum on-site quantity.
  • EPA regional administrators may require any facility they assess on a case-by-case basis to develop an FRP based on site-specific factors. So, even if your facility determines it doesn’t meet the applicability criteria, an EPA regional administrator may still require your facility to prepare an FRP.

Key to remember: A final rule under the Clean Water Act requires certain facilities to develop, submit to EPA, and implement Facility Response Plans for worst-case discharges of hazardous substances into navigable waters.

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2024-04-04T05:00:00Z

EPA Final Rule: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Ethylene Production, Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing, Organic Liquids Distribution (Non-Gasoline), and Petroleum Refineries Reconsideration

On July 6, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) finalized the residual risk and technology review (RTR) conducted for the Ethylene Production source category, which is part of the Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP); on July 7, 2020, the EPA finalized the RTR conducted for the Organic Liquids Distribution (Non-Gasoline) NESHAP; and on August 12, 2020, the EPA finalized the RTR conducted for the Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing NESHAP. Amendments to the Petroleum Refinery Sector NESHAP were most recently finalized on February 4, 2020. Subsequently, the EPA received and granted various petitions for reconsideration on these NESHAP for, among other things, the provisions related to the work practice standards for pressure relief devices (PRDs), emergency flaring, and degassing of floating roof storage vessels. This action finalizes proposed amendments to remove the force majeure exemption for PRDs and emergency flaring, incorporate clarifications for the degassing requirements for floating roof storage vessels, and address other corrections and clarifications.

DATES: This final action is effective on April 4, 2024, published in the Federal Register April 4, 2024, page 23840.

View final rule.

§63.641 Definitions.
Definition of “Flare”RevisedView text
§63.643 Miscellaneous process vent provisions.
(c)(1)-(2)RevisedView text
§63.648 Equipment leak standards.
(j)(3)(iv), (j)(3)(v)(B) and (C), (j)(6) introductory text, and (j)(6)(ii)RevisedView text
§63.655 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.
(g)RevisedView text
(i)(9)-(12)RevisedView text
§63.670 Requirements for flare control devices.
(b), (d) introductory text, (e), (l)(5) introductory text, (o)(4)(iv), (o)(6), (o)(7)(ii) through (o)(7)(v)RevisedView text
(d)(3)AddedView text
§63.671 Requirements for flare monitoring systems.
(e) introductory textRevisedView text
(e)(4), (f)AddedView text
Appendix to Subpart CC of Part 63—Tables
Table 13RevisedView text
§63.1100 Applicability.
(b), (g)(7)(iii)RevisedView text
§63.1102 Compliance schedule.
(c)(11), (d)(2)(ii), (e)(2)(iii)RevisedView text
§63.1103 Source category-specific applicability, definitions, and requirements.
(e)RevisedView text
§63.1107 Equipment leaks.
(h)(3)(iv), (h)(3)(v)(B) and (C), (h)(6) introductory text, and (h)(6)(ii)RevisedView text
§63.1109 Recordkeeping requirements.
(f)(2), (3), and (5), and (i)(2)RevisedView text
§63.1110 Reporting requirements.
(a)(10), (e)(4)(iii), (e)(4)(iv)(A) and (B), (e)(5)(iii), and (e)(8)(iii)RevisedView text
§63.2346 What emission limitations, operating limits, and work practice standards must I meet?
(a)(6) introductory text, (e)RevisedView text
(a)(6)(iv)AddedView text
§63.2378 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations, operating limits, and work practice standards?
(e)RevisedView text
§63.2382 What notifications must I submit and when and what information should be submitted?
(d)RevisedView text
§63.2386 What reports must I submit and when and what information is to be submitted in each?
(f), (g), and (h)RevisedView text
(i)-(j)RemovedView text
§63.2406 What definitions apply to this subpart?
Definition of ”Force majeure event”RemovedView text
Table 12 to Subpart EEEE of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart EEEE
“63.9(k)”AddedView text
”63.7(a)(4)”“63.9(k)”RevisedView text
§63.2450 What are my general requirements for complying with this subpart?
(e)(1), (e)(5)(iv), (e)(5)(viii)(B), (e)(6)(i), (e)(7) introductory text, (v)(1)(i), (v)(1)(ii), and (v)(2)RevisedView text
§63.2460 What requirements must I meet for batch process vents?
(c)(9) introductory textView text
§63.2470 What requirements must I meet for storage tanks?
(f)RevisedView text
§63.2480 What requirements must I meet for equipment leaks?
(a), (e)(2)(ii), (e)(2)(iii), (e)(3)(iv), (e)(3)(v)(B), (e)(3)(v)(C), (e)(6)(ii), (f)(18)(iii), (f)(18)(vi), (f)(18)(x), and (f)(18)(xiii)RevisedView text
§63.2490 What requirements must I meet for heat exchange systems?
(a), (d) introductory text, and (d)(4)(iii) introductory text;RevisedView text
(e)AddedView text
§63.2492 How do I determine whether my process vent, storage tank, or equipment is in ethylene oxide service?
(b)RevisedView text
§63.2493 What requirements must I meet for process vents, storage tanks, or equipment that are in ethylene oxide service?
(a)(2)(vi) introductory text, (a)(2)(vi)(C), (a)(2)(viii), (b)(2), (b)(4) introductory text, (b)(4)(iv), (b)(6), (d)(1)(iii), (d)(2)(iii), (d)(3), (d)(4)(v), and (e) introductory textRevisedView text
§63.2515 What notifications must I submit and when?
(d)RevisedView text
§63.2520 What reports must I submit and when?
(d) introductory text, (e) introductory text, (e)(2), (e)(14)(iii), (e)(16), (f) and (g)RevisedView text
(d)(6)AddedView text
(h)-(i)RemovedView text
§63.2525 What records must I keep?
(o), (p)(2), (p)(3), (p)(5), (q)(2), (r)(1), (r)(4)(iv) introductory text, (r)(4)(iv)(B) and (r)(4)(iv)(C)RevisedView text
(r)(4)(iv)(D)AddedView text
§63.2550 What definitions apply to this subpart?
“In ethylene oxide service’”RevisedView text
Table 10 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Work Practice Standards for Heat Exchange Systems
Entire tableRevisedView text
Table 12 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart FFFF
Entry ”63.9(k)”RevisedView text

Previous Text

§63.641 Definitions.

* * * *

Flare means a combustion device lacking an enclosed combustion chamber that uses an uncontrolled volume of ambient air to burn gases. For the purposes of this rule, the definition of flare includes, but is not necessarily limited to, air-assisted flares, steam-assisted flares and non-assisted flares.

§63.643 Miscellaneous process vent provisions.

* * * *

(c)(1) Prior to venting to the atmosphere, process liquids are removed from the equipment as much as practical and the equipment is depressured to a control device meeting requirements in paragraphs (a)(1) or (2) of this section, a fuel gas system, or back to the process until one of the following conditions, as applicable, is met.

(i) The vapor in the equipment served by the maintenance vent has a lower explosive limit (LEL) of less than 10 percent.

(ii) If there is no ability to measure the LEL of the vapor in the equipment based on the design of the equipment, the pressure in the equipment served by the maintenance vent is reduced to 5 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) or less. Upon opening the maintenance vent, active purging of the equipment cannot be used until the LEL of the vapors in the maintenance vent (or inside the equipment if the maintenance is a hatch or similar type of opening) is less than 10 percent.

(iii) The equipment served by the maintenance vent contains less than 72 pounds of total volatile organic compounds (VOC).

(iv) If the maintenance vent is associated with equipment containing pyrophoric catalyst (e.g., hydrotreaters and hydrocrackers) and a pure hydrogen supply is not available at the equipment at the time of the startup, shutdown, maintenance, or inspection activity, the LEL of the vapor in the equipment must be less than 20 percent, except for one event per year not to exceed 35 percent.

(v) If, after applying best practices to isolate and purge equipment served by a maintenance vent, none of the applicable criterion in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iv) of this section can be met prior to installing or removing a blind flange or similar equipment blind, the pressure in the equipment served by the maintenance vent is reduced to 2 psig or less. Active purging of the equipment may be used provided the equipment pressure at the location where purge gas is introduced remains at 2 psig or less.

(c)(2) Except for maintenance vents complying with the alternative in paragraph (c)(1)(iii) of this section, the owner or operator must determine the LEL or, if applicable, equipment pressure using process instrumentation or portable measurement devices and follow procedures for calibration and maintenance according to manufacturer's specifications.

§63.648 Equipment leak standards.

* * * *

(j)(3)(iv) The owner or operator shall determine the total number of release events occurred during the calendar year for each affected pressure relief device separately. The owner or operator shall also determine the total number of release events for each pressure relief device for which the root cause analysis concluded that the root cause was a force majeure event, as defined in this subpart.

* * * *

(j)(3)(v)(B) A second release event not including force majeure events from a single pressure relief device in a 3 calendar year period for the same root cause for the same equipment.

(j)(3)(v)(C) A third release event not including force majeure events from a single pressure relief device in a 3 calendar year period for any reason.

* * * *

(j)(6) Root cause analysis and corrective action analysis. A root cause analysis and corrective action analysis must be completed as soon as possible, but no later than 45 days after a release event. Special circumstances affecting the number of root cause analyses and/or corrective action analyses are provided in paragraphs (j)(6)(i) through (iv) of this section.

* * * *

(j)(6)(ii) You may conduct a single root cause analysis and corrective action analysis for a single emergency event that causes two or more pressure relief devices to release, regardless of the equipment served, if the root cause is reasonably expected to be a force majeure event, as defined in this subpart.

§63.655 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

* * * *

(g) The owner or operator of a source subject to this subpart shall submit Periodic Reports no later than 60 days after the end of each 6-month period when any of the information specified in paragraphs (g)(1) through (7) of this section or paragraphs (g)(9) through (14) of this section is collected. The first 6-month period shall begin on the date the Notification of Compliance Status report is required to be submitted. A Periodic Report is not required if none of the events identified in paragraphs (g)(1) through (7) of this section or paragraphs (g)(9) through (14) of this section occurred during the 6-month period unless emissions averaging is utilized. Quarterly reports must be submitted for emission points included in emission averages, as provided in paragraph (g)(8) of this section. An owner or operator may submit reports required by other regulations in place of or as part of the Periodic Report required by this paragraph (g) if the reports contain the information required by paragraphs (g)(1) through (14) of this section.

(1) For storage vessels, Periodic Reports shall include the information specified for Periodic Reports in paragraphs (g)(2) through (5) of this section. Information related to gaskets, slotted membranes, and sleeve seals is not required for storage vessels that are part of an existing source complying with §63.646.

(2) Internal floating roofs.(i) An owner or operator who elects to comply with §63.646 by using a fixed roof and an internal floating roof or by using an external floating roof converted to an internal floating roof shall submit the results of each inspection conducted in accordance with §63.120(a) of subpart G in which a failure is detected in the control equipment.

(A) For vessels for which annual inspections are required under §63.120(a)(2)(i) or (a)(3)(ii) of subpart G, the specifications and requirements listed in paragraphs (g)(2)(i)(A)(1) through (3) of this section apply.

(1) A failure is defined as any time in which the internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the liquid inside the storage vessel and is not resting on the leg supports; or there is liquid on the floating roof; or the seal is detached from the internal floating roof; or there are holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or seal fabric; or there are visible gaps between the seal and the wall of the storage vessel.

(2) Except as provided in paragraph (g)(2)(i)(A)(3) of this section, each Periodic Report shall include the date of the inspection, identification of each storage vessel in which a failure was detected, and a description of the failure. The Periodic Report shall also describe the nature of and date the repair was made or the date the storage vessel was emptied.

(3) If an extension is utilized in accordance with §63.120(a)(4) of subpart G, the owner or operator shall, in the next Periodic Report, identify the vessel; include the documentation specified in §63.120(a)(4) of subpart G; and describe the date the storage vessel was emptied and the nature of and date the repair was made.

(B) For vessels for which inspections are required under §63.120(a)(2)(ii), (a)(3)(i), or (a)(3)(iii) of subpart G (i.e., internal inspections), the specifications and requirements listed in paragraphs (g)(2)(i)(B)(1) and (2) of this section apply.

(1) A failure is defined as any time in which the internal floating roof has defects; or the primary seal has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or the secondary seal (if one has been installed) has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or, for a storage vessel that is part of a new source, the gaskets no longer close off the liquid surface from the atmosphere; or, for a storage vessel that is part of a new source, the slotted membrane has more than a 10 percent open area.

(2) Each Periodic Report shall include the date of the inspection, identification of each storage vessel in which a failure was detected, and a description of the failure. The Periodic Report shall also describe the nature of and date the repair was made.

(ii) An owner or operator who elects to comply with §63.660 by using a fixed roof and an internal floating roof shall submit the results of each inspection conducted in accordance with §63.1063(c)(1), (d)(1), and (d)(2) of subpart WW in which a failure is detected in the control equipment. For vessels for which inspections are required under §63.1063(c) and (d), the specifications and requirements listed in paragraphs (g)(2)(ii)(A) through (C) of this section apply.

(A) A failure is defined in §63.1063(d)(1) of subpart WW.

(B) Each Periodic Report shall include a copy of the inspection record required by §63.1065(b) of subpart WW when a failure occurs.

(C) An owner or operator who elects to use an extension in accordance with §63.1063(e)(2) of subpart WW shall, in the next Periodic Report, submit the documentation required by §63.1063(e)(2).

(3) External floating roofs.(i) An owner or operator who elects to comply with §63.646 by using an external floating roof shall meet the periodic reporting requirements specified in paragraphs (g)(3)(i)(A) through (C) of this section.

(A) The owner or operator shall submit, as part of the Periodic Report, documentation of the results of each seal gap measurement made in accordance with §63.120(b) of subpart G in which the seal and seal gap requirements of §63.120(b)(3), (4), (5), or (6) of subpart G are not met. This documentation shall include the information specified in paragraphs (g)(3)(i)(A)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) The date of the seal gap measurement.

(2) The raw data obtained in the seal gap measurement and the calculations described in §63.120(b)(3) and (4) of subpart G.

(3) A description of any seal condition specified in §63.120(b)(5) or (6) of subpart G that is not met.

(4) A description of the nature of and date the repair was made, or the date the storage vessel was emptied.

(B) If an extension is utilized in accordance with §63.120(b)(7)(ii) or (b)(8) of subpart G, the owner or operator shall, in the next Periodic Report, identify the vessel; include the documentation specified in §63.120(b)(7)(ii) or (b)(8) of subpart G, as applicable; and describe the date the vessel was emptied and the nature of and date the repair was made.

(C) The owner or operator shall submit, as part of the Periodic Report, documentation of any failures that are identified during visual inspections required by §63.120(b)(10) of subpart G. This documentation shall meet the specifications and requirements in paragraphs (g)(3)(i)(C)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) A failure is defined as any time in which the external floating roof has defects; or the primary seal has holes or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or the secondary seal has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or, for a storage vessel that is part of a new source, the gaskets no longer close off the liquid surface from the atmosphere; or, for a storage vessel that is part of a new source, the slotted membrane has more than 10 percent open area.

(2) Each Periodic Report shall include the date of the inspection, identification of each storage vessel in which a failure was detected, and a description of the failure. The Periodic Report shall also describe the nature of and date the repair was made.

(ii) An owner or operator who elects to comply with §63.660 by using an external floating roof shall meet the periodic reporting requirements specified in paragraphs (g)(3)(ii)(A) and (B) of this section.

(A) For vessels for which inspections are required under §63.1063(c)(2), (d)(1), and (d)(3) of subpart WW, the owner or operator shall submit, as part of the Periodic Report, a copy of the inspection record required by §63.1065(b) of subpart WW when a failure occurs. A failure is defined in §63.1063(d)(1).

(B) An owner or operator who elects to use an extension in accordance with §63.1063(e)(2) or (c)(2)(iv)(B) of subpart WW shall, in the next Periodic Report, submit the documentation required by those paragraphs.

(4) [Reserved]

(5) An owner or operator who elects to comply with §63.646 or §63.660 by installing a closed vent system and control device shall submit, as part of the next Periodic Report, the information specified in paragraphs (g)(5)(i) through (v) of this section, as applicable.

(i) The Periodic Report shall include the information specified in paragraphs (g)(5)(i)(A) and (B) of this section for those planned routine maintenance operations that would require the control device not to meet the requirements of either §63.119(e)(1) or (2) of subpart G, §63.985(a) and (b) of subpart SS or §63.670, as applicable.

(A) A description of the planned routine maintenance that is anticipated to be performed for the control device during the next 6 months. This description shall include the type of maintenance necessary, planned frequency of maintenance, and lengths of maintenance periods.

(B) A description of the planned routine maintenance that was performed for the control device during the previous 6 months. This description shall include the type of maintenance performed and the total number of hours during those 6 months that the control device did not meet the requirements of either §63.119(e)(1) or (2) of subpart G, §63.985(a) and (b) of subpart SS or §63.670, as applicable, due to planned routine maintenance.

(ii) If a control device other than a flare is used, the Periodic Report shall describe each occurrence when the monitored parameters were outside of the parameter ranges documented in the Notification of Compliance Status report. The description shall include: Identification of the control device for which the measured parameters were outside of the established ranges, and causes for the measured parameters to be outside of the established ranges.

(iii) If a flare is used prior to January 30, 2019 and prior to electing to comply with the requirements in §63.670, the Periodic Report shall describe each occurrence when the flare does not meet the general control device requirements specified in §63.11(b) of subpart A and shall include: Identification of the flare that does not meet the general requirements specified in §63.11(b) of subpart A, and reasons the flare did not meet the general requirements specified in §63.11(b) of subpart A.

(iv) If a flare is used on or after the date for which compliance with the requirements in §63.670 is elected, which can be no later than January 30, 2019, the Periodic Report shall include the items specified in paragraph (g)(11) of this section.

(v) An owner or operator who elects to comply with §63.660 by installing an alternate control device as described in §63.1064 of subpart WW shall submit, as part of the next Periodic Report, a written application as described in §63.1066(b)(3) of subpart WW.

(6) For miscellaneous process vents for which continuous parameter monitors are required by this subpart, periods of excess emissions shall be identified in the Periodic Reports and shall be used to determine compliance with the emission standards.

(i) Period of excess emission means any of the following conditions:

(A) An operating day when the daily average value of a monitored parameter, except presence of a flare pilot flame, is outside the range specified in the Notification of Compliance Status report. Monitoring data recorded during periods of monitoring system breakdown, repairs, calibration checks and zero (low-level) and high-level adjustments shall not be used in computing daily average values of monitored parameters.

(B) An operating day when all pilot flames of a flare are absent.

(C) An operating day when monitoring data required to be recorded in paragraphs (i)(3) (i) and (ii) of this section are available for less than 75 percent of the operating hours.

(D) For data compression systems under paragraph (h)(5)(iii) of this section, an operating day when the monitor operated for less than 75 percent of the operating hours or a day when less than 18 monitoring values were recorded.

(ii) For miscellaneous process vents, excess emissions shall be reported for the operating parameters specified in table 10 of this subpart unless other site-specific parameter(s) have been approved by the operating permit authority.

(iii) For periods in closed vent systems when a Group 1 miscellaneous process vent stream was detected in the bypass line or diverted from the control device and either directly to the atmosphere or to a control device that does not comply with the requirements in §63.643(a), report the date, time, duration, estimate of the volume of gas, the concentration of organic HAP in the gas and the resulting mass emissions of organic HAP that bypassed the control device. For periods when the flow indicator is not operating, report the date, time, and duration.

(7) If a performance test for determination of compliance for a new emission point subject to this subpart or for an emission point that has changed from Group 2 to Group 1 is conducted during the period covered by a Periodic Report, the results of the performance test shall be included in the Periodic Report.

(i) Results of the performance test shall include the identification of the source tested, the date of the test, the percentage of emissions reduction or outlet pollutant concentration reduction (whichever is needed to determine compliance) for each run and for the average of all runs, and the values of the monitored operating parameters.

(ii) The complete test report shall be maintained onsite.

(8) The owner or operator of a source shall submit quarterly reports for all emission points included in an emissions average.

(i) The quarterly reports shall be submitted no later than 60 calendar days after the end of each quarter. The first report shall be submitted with the Notification of Compliance Status report no later than 150 days after the compliance date specified in §63.640.

(ii) The quarterly reports shall include:

(A) The information specified in this paragraph and in paragraphs (g)(2) through (g)(7) of this section for all storage vessels and miscellaneous process vents included in an emissions average;

(B) The information required to be reported by §63.428 (h)(1), (h)(2), and (h)(3) for each gasoline loading rack included in an emissions average, unless this information has already been submitted in a separate report;

(C) The information required to be reported by §63.567(e)(4) and (j)(3) of subpart Y for each marine tank vessel loading operation included in an emissions average, unless the information has already been submitted in a separate report;

(D) Any information pertaining to each wastewater stream included in an emissions average that the source is required to report under the Implementation Plan for the source;

(E) The credits and debits calculated each month during the quarter;

(F) A demonstration that debits calculated for the quarter are not more than 1.30 times the credits calculated for the quarter, as required under §§63.652(e)(4);

(G) The values of any inputs to the credit and debit equations in §63.652 (g) and (h) that change from month to month during the quarter or that have changed since the previous quarter; and

(H) Any other information the source is required to report under the Implementation Plan for the source.

(iii) Every fourth quarterly report shall include the following:

(A) A demonstration that annual credits are greater than or equal to annual debits as required by §63.652(e)(3); and

(B) A certification of compliance with all the emissions averaging provisions in §63.652 of this subpart.

(9) For heat exchange systems, Periodic Reports must include the following information:

(i) The number of heat exchange systems at the plant site subject to the monitoring requirements in §63.654.

(ii) The number of heat exchange systems at the plant site found to be leaking.

(iii) For each monitoring location where the total strippable hydrocarbon concentration was determined to be equal to or greater than the applicable leak definitions specified in §63.654(c)(6), identification of the monitoring location (e.g., unique monitoring location or heat exchange system ID number), the measured total strippable hydrocarbon concentration, the date the leak was first identified, and, if applicable, the date the source of the leak was identified;

(iv) For leaks that were repaired during the reporting period (including delayed repairs), identification of the monitoring location associated with the repaired leak, the total strippable hydrocarbon concentration measured during re-monitoring to verify repair, and the re-monitoring date (i.e., the effective date of repair); and

(v) For each delayed repair, identification of the monitoring location associated with the leak for which repair is delayed, the date when the delay of repair began, the date the repair is expected to be completed (if the leak is not repaired during the reporting period), the total strippable hydrocarbon concentration and date of each monitoring event conducted on the delayed repair during the reporting period, and an estimate of the potential strippable hydrocarbon emissions over the reporting period associated with the delayed repair.

(10) For pressure relief devices subject to the requirements §63.648(j), Periodic Reports must include the information specified in paragraphs (g)(10)(i) through (iv) of this section.

(i) For pressure relief devices in organic HAP gas or vapor service, pursuant to §63.648(j)(1), report any instrument reading of 500 ppm or greater.

(ii) For pressure relief devices in organic HAP gas or vapor service subject to §63.648(j)(2), report confirmation that any monitoring required to be done during the reporting period to show compliance was conducted.

(iii) For pilot-operated pressure relief devices in organic HAP service, report each pressure release to the atmosphere through the pilot vent that equals or exceeds 72 pounds of VOC per day, including duration of the pressure release through the pilot vent and estimate of the mass quantity of each organic HAP released.

(iv) For pressure relief devices in organic HAP service subject to §63.648(j)(3), report each pressure release to the atmosphere, including duration of the pressure release and estimate of the mass quantity of each organic HAP released, and the results of any root cause analysis and corrective action analysis completed during the reporting period, including the corrective actions implemented during the reporting period and, if applicable, the implementation schedule for planned corrective actions to be implemented subsequent to the reporting period.

(11) For flares subject to §63.670, Periodic Reports must include the information specified in paragraphs (g)(11)(i) through (iv) of this section.

(i) Records as specified in paragraph (i)(9)(i) of this section for each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute when regulated material is routed to a flare and no pilot flame is present.

(ii) Visible emission records as specified in paragraph (i)(9)(ii)(C) of this section for each period of 2 consecutive hours during which visible emissions exceeded a total of 5 minutes.

(iii) The 15-minute block periods for which the applicable operating limits specified in §63.670(d) through (f) are not met. Indicate the date and time for the period, the net heating value operating parameter(s) determined following the methods in §63.670(k) through (n) as applicable.

(iv) For flaring events meeting the criteria in §63.670(o)(3):

(A) The start and stop time and date of the flaring event.

(B) The length of time for which emissions were visible from the flare during the event.

(C) The periods of time that the flare tip velocity exceeds the maximum flare tip velocity determined using the methods in §63.670(d)(2) and the maximum 15-minute block average flare tip velocity recorded during the event.

(D) Results of the root cause and corrective actions analysis completed during the reporting period, including the corrective actions implemented during the reporting period and, if applicable, the implementation schedule for planned corrective actions to be implemented subsequent to the reporting period.

(12) For delayed coking units, the Periodic Report must include the information specified in paragraphs (g)(12)(i) through (iv) of this section.

(i) For existing source delayed coking units, any 60-cycle average exceeding the applicable limit in §63.657(a)(1).

(ii) For new source delayed coking units, any direct venting event exceeding the applicable limit in §63.657(a)(2).

(iii) The total number of double quenching events performed during the reporting period.

(iv) For each double quenching draining event when the drain water temperature exceeded 210°F, report the drum, date, time, the coke drum vessel pressure or temperature, as applicable, when pre-vent draining was initiated, and the maximum drain water temperature during the pre-vent draining period.

(13) For maintenance vents subject to the requirements in §63.643(c), Periodic Reports must include the information specified in paragraphs (g)(13)(i) through (iv) of this section for any release exceeding the applicable limits in §63.643(c)(1). For the purposes of this reporting requirement, owners or operators complying with §63.643(c)(1)(iv) must report each venting event for which the lower explosive limit is 20 percent or greater; owners or operators complying with §63.643(c)(1)(v) must report each venting event conducted under those provisions and include an explanation for each event as to why utilization of this alternative was required.

(i) Identification of the maintenance vent and the equipment served by the maintenance vent.

(ii) The date and time the maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere.

(iii) The lower explosive limit, vessel pressure, or mass of VOC in the equipment, as applicable, at the start of atmospheric venting. If the 5 psig vessel pressure option in §63.643(c)(1)(ii) was used and active purging was initiated while the lower explosive limit was 10 percent or greater, also include the lower explosive limit of the vapors at the time active purging was initiated.

(iv) An estimate of the mass of organic HAP released during the entire atmospheric venting event.

(14) Any changes in the information provided in a previous Notification of Compliance Status report.

* * * *

(i)(9) For each flare subject to §63.670, each owner or operator shall keep the records specified in paragraphs (i)(9)(i) through (xii) of this section up-to-date and readily accessible, as applicable.

(i) Retain records of the output of the monitoring device used to detect the presence of a pilot flame as required in §63.670(b) for a minimum of 2 years. Retain records of each 15-minute block during which there was at least one minute that no pilot flame is present when regulated material is routed to a flare for a minimum of 5 years.

(ii) Retain records of daily visible emissions observations or video surveillance images required in §63.670(h) as specified in the paragraphs (i)(9)(ii)(A) through (C), as applicable, for a minimum of 3 years.

(A) If visible emissions observations are performed using Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7, the record must identify whether the visible emissions observation was performed, the results of each observation, total duration of observed visible emissions, and whether it was a 5-minute or 2-hour observation. If the owner or operator performs visible emissions observations more than one time during a day, the record must also identify the date and time of day each visible emissions observation was performed.

(B) If video surveillance camera is used, the record must include all video surveillance images recorded, with time and date stamps.

(C) For each 2 hour period for which visible emissions are observed for more than 5 minutes in 2 consecutive hours, the record must include the date and time of the 2 hour period and an estimate of the cumulative number of minutes in the 2 hour period for which emissions were visible.

(iii) The 15-minute block average cumulative flows for flare vent gas and, if applicable, total steam, perimeter assist air, and premix assist air specified to be monitored under §63.670(i), along with the date and time interval for the 15-minute block. If multiple monitoring locations are used to determine cumulative vent gas flow, total steam, perimeter assist air, and premix assist air, retain records of the 15-minute block average flows for each monitoring location for a minimum of 2 years, and retain the 15-minute block average cumulative flows that are used in subsequent calculations for a minimum of 5 years. If pressure and temperature monitoring is used, retain records of the 15-minute block average temperature, pressure and molecular weight of the flare vent gas or assist gas stream for each measurement location used to determine the 15-minute block average cumulative flows for a minimum of 2 years, and retain the 15-minute block average cumulative flows that are used in subsequent calculations for a minimum of 5 years.

(iv) The flare vent gas compositions specified to be monitored under §63.670(j). Retain records of individual component concentrations from each compositional analyses for a minimum of 2 years. If NHVvg analyzer is used, retain records of the 15-minute block average values for a minimum of 5 years.

(v) Each 15-minute block average operating parameter calculated following the methods specified in §63.670(k) through (n), as applicable.

(vi) [Reserved]

(vii) All periods during which operating values are outside of the applicable operating limits specified in §63.670(d) through (f) when regulated material is being routed to the flare.

(viii) All periods during which the owner or operator does not perform flare monitoring according to the procedures in §63.670(g) through (j).

(ix) Records of periods when there is flow of vent gas to the flare, but when there is no flow of regulated material to the flare, including the start and stop time and dates of periods of no regulated material flow.

(x) Records when the flow of vent gas exceeds the smokeless capacity of the flare, including start and stop time and dates of the flaring event.

(xi) Records of the root cause analysis and corrective action analysis conducted as required in §63.670(o)(3), including an identification of the affected facility, the date and duration of the event, a statement noting whether the event resulted from the same root cause(s) identified in a previous analysis and either a description of the recommended corrective action(s) or an explanation of why corrective action is not necessary under §63.670(o)(5)(i).

(xii) For any corrective action analysis for which implementation of corrective actions are required in §63.670(o)(5), a description of the corrective action(s) completed within the first 45 days following the discharge and, for action(s) not already completed, a schedule for implementation, including proposed commencement and completion dates.

(10) [Reserved]

(11) For each pressure relief device subject to the pressure release management work practice standards in §63.648(j)(3), the owner or operator shall keep the records specified in paragraphs (i)(11)(i) through (iii) of this section. For each pilot-operated pressure relief device subject to the requirements at §63.648(j)(3), the owner or operator shall keep the records specified in paragraph (i)(11)(iv) of this section.

(i) Records of the prevention measures implemented as required in §63.648(j)(3)(ii), if applicable.

(ii) Records of the number of releases during each calendar year and the number of those releases for which the root cause was determined to be a force majeure event. Keep these records for the current calendar year and the past five calendar years.

(iii) For each release to the atmosphere, the owner or operator shall keep the records specified in paragraphs (i)(11)(iii)(A) through (D) of this section.

(A) The start and end time and date of each pressure release to the atmosphere.

(B) Records of any data, assumptions, and calculations used to estimate of the mass quantity of each organic HAP released during the event.

(C) Records of the root cause analysis and corrective action analysis conducted as required in §63.648(j)(3)(iii), including an identification of the affected facility, the date and duration of the event, a statement noting whether the event resulted from the same root cause(s) identified in a previous analysis and either a description of the recommended corrective action(s) or an explanation of why corrective action is not necessary under §63.648(j)(7)(i).

(D) For any corrective action analysis for which implementation of corrective actions are required in §63.648(j)(7), a description of the corrective action(s) completed within the first 45 days following the discharge and, for action(s) not already completed, a schedule for implementation, including proposed commencement and completion dates.

(iv) For pilot-operated pressure relief devices, general or release-specific records for estimating the quantity of VOC released from the pilot vent during a release event, and records of calculations used to determine the quantity of specific HAP released for any event or series of events in which 72 or more pounds of VOC are released in a day.

(12) For each maintenance vent opening subject to the requirements in §63.643(c), the owner or operator shall keep the applicable records specified in paragraphs (i)(12)(i) through (vi) of this section.

(i) The owner or operator shall maintain standard site procedures used to deinventory equipment for safety purposes (e.g., hot work or vessel entry procedures) to document the procedures used to meet the requirements in §63.643(c). The current copy of the procedures shall be retained and available on-site at all times. Previous versions of the standard site procedures, is applicable, shall be retained for five years.

(ii) If complying with the requirements of §63.643(c)(1)(i) and the lower explosive limit at the time of the vessel opening exceeds 10 percent, identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, and the lower explosive limit at the time of the vessel opening.

(iii) If complying with the requirements of §63.643(c)(1)(ii) and either the vessel pressure at the time of the vessel opening exceeds 5 psig or the lower explosive limit at the time of the active purging was initiated exceeds 10 percent, identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, the pressure of the vessel or equipment at the time of discharge to the atmosphere and, if applicable, the lower explosive limit of the vapors in the equipment when active purging was initiated.

(iv) If complying with the requirements of §63.643(c)(1)(iii), records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment and the type and size limits of equipment that contain less than 72 pounds of VOC at the time of maintenance vent opening. For each maintenance vent opening for which the deinventory procedures specified in paragraph (i)(12)(i) of this section are not followed or for which the equipment opened exceeds the type and size limits established in the records specified in this paragraph, identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, and records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment at the time the maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere.

(v) If complying with the requirements of §63.643(c)(1)(iv), identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, records documenting the lack of a pure hydrogen supply, the date of maintenance vent opening, and the lower explosive limit of the vapors in the equipment at the time of discharge to the atmosphere for each applicable maintenance vent opening.

(vi) If complying with the requirements of §63.643(c)(1)(v), identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent, records documenting actions taken to comply with other applicable alternatives and why utilization of this alternative was required, the date of maintenance vent opening, the equipment pressure and lower explosive limit of the vapors in the equipment at the time of discharge, an indication of whether active purging was performed and the pressure of the equipment during the installation or removal of the blind if active purging was used, the duration the maintenance vent was open during the blind installation or removal process, and records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment at the time the maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere for each applicable maintenance vent opening.

§63.670 Requirements for flare control devices.

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(b) Pilot flame presence. The owner or operator shall operate each flare with a pilot flame present at all times when regulated material is routed to the flare. Each 15-minute block during which there is at least one minute where no pilot flame is present when regulated material is routed to the flare is a deviation of the standard. Deviations in different 15-minute blocks from the same event are considered separate deviations. The owner or operator shall monitor for the presence of a pilot flame as specified in paragraph (g) of this section.

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(d) Flare tip velocity. For each flare, the owner or operator shall comply with either paragraph (d)(1) or (2) of this section, provided the appropriate monitoring systems are in-place, whenever regulated material is routed to the flare for at least 15-minutes and the flare vent gas flow rate is less than the smokeless design capacity of the flare.

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(e) Combustion zone operating limits. For each flare, the owner or operator shall operate the flare to maintain the net heating value of flare combustion zone gas (NHVcz) at or above 270 British thermal units per standard cubic feet (Btu/scf) determined on a 15-minute block period basis when regulated material is routed to the flare for at least 15-minutes. The owner or operator shall monitor and calculate NHVcz as specified in paragraph (m) of this section.

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(5) When a continuous monitoring system is used as provided in paragraph (j)(1) or (3) of this section and, if applicable, paragraph (j)(4) of this section, the owner or operator may elect to determine the 15-minute block average NHVvg using either the calculation methods in paragraph (l)(5)(i) of this section or the calculation methods in paragraph (l)(5)(ii) of this section. The owner or operator may choose to comply using the calculation methods in paragraph (l)(5)(i) of this section for some flares at the petroleum refinery and comply using the calculation methods (l)(5)(ii) of this section for other flares. However, for each flare, the owner or operator must elect one calculation method that will apply at all times, and use that method for all continuously monitored flare vent streams associated with that flare. If the owner or operator intends to change the calculation method that applies to a flare, the owner or operator must notify the Administrator 30 days in advance of such a change.

(i) Feed-forward calculation method. When calculating NHVvg for a specific 15-minute block:

(A) Use the results from the first sample collected during an event, (for periodic flare vent gas flow events) for the first 15-minute block associated with that event.

(B) If the results from the first sample collected during an event (for periodic flare vent gas flow events) are not available until after the second 15-minute block starts, use the results from the first sample collected during an event for the second 15-minute block associated with that event.

(C) For all other cases, use the results that are available from the most recent sample prior to the 15-minute block period for that 15-minute block period for all flare vent gas steams. For the purpose of this requirement, use the time that the results become available rather than the time the sample was collected. For example, if a sample is collected at 12:25 a.m. and the analysis is completed at 12:38 a.m., the results are available at 12:38 a.m. and these results would be used to determine compliance during the 15-minute block period from 12:45 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.

(ii) Direct calculation method. When calculating NHVvg for a specific 15-minute block:

(A) If the results from the first sample collected during an event (for periodic flare vent gas flow events) are not available until after the second 15-minute block starts, use the results from the first sample collected during an event for the first 15-minute block associated with that event.

(B) For all other cases, use the arithmetic average of all NHVvg measurement data results that become available during a 15-minute block to calculate the 15-minute block average for that period. For the purpose of this requirement, use the time that the results become available rather than the time the sample was collected. For example, if a sample is collected at 12:25 a.m. and the analysis is completed at 12:38 a.m., the results are available at 12:38 a.m. and these results would be used to determine compliance during the 15-minute block period from 12:30 a.m. to 12:45 a.m.

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(o)(4)(iv) You may conduct a single root cause analysis and corrective action analysis for a single event that causes two or more flares to have a flow event meeting the criteria in paragraph (o)(3)(i) or (ii) of this section, regardless of the configuration of the flares, if the root cause is reasonably expected to be a force majeure event, as defined in this subpart.

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(o)(6) The owner or operator shall determine the total number of events for which a root cause and corrective action analyses was required during the calendar year for each affected flare separately for events meeting the criteria in paragraph (o)(3)(i) of this section and those meeting the criteria in paragraph (o)(3)(ii) of this section. For the purpose of this requirement, a single root cause analysis conducted for an event that met both of the criteria in paragraphs (o)(3)(i) and (ii) of this section would be counted as an event under each of the separate criteria counts for that flare. Additionally, if a single root cause analysis was conducted for an event that caused multiple flares to meet the criteria in paragraph (o)(3)(i) or (ii) of this section, that event would count as an event for each of the flares for each criteria in paragraph (o)(3) of this section that was met during that event. The owner or operator shall also determine the total number of events for which a root cause and correct action analyses was required and the analyses concluded that the root cause was a force majeure event, as defined in this subpart.

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(o)(7)(ii) Two visible emissions exceedance events meeting the criteria in paragraph (o)(3)(i) of this section that were not caused by a force majeure event from a singl