J. J. Keller® Compliance Network Logo
Start Experiencing Compliance Network for Free!
Update to Professional Trial!

Be Part of the Ultimate Safety & Compliance Community

Trending news, knowledge-building content, and more – all personalized to you!

Already have an account?
FREE TRIAL UPGRADE!
Thank you for investing in EnvironmentalHazmat related content. Click 'UPGRADE' to continue.
CANCEL
YOU'RE ALL SET!
Enjoy your limited-time access to the Compliance Network Professional Trial!
A confirmation welcome email has been sent to your email address from ComplianceNetwork@t.jjkellercompliancenetwork.com. Please check your spam/junk folder if you can't find it in your inbox.
YOU'RE ALL SET!
Thank you for your interest in EnvironmentalHazmat related content.
WHOOPS!
You've reached your limit of free access, if you'd like more info, please contact us at 800-327-6868.

Does travel time count as working time?

Test how much you know about travel time as working time. Click below to see answers.

  1. Four kinds of travel time are considered working time under federal regulations.
    1. True
    2. False
  2. A normal commute to work and back home is not paid working time.
    1. True
    2. False
  3. Travel time spent carrying heavy, burdensome equipment is hours worked.
    1. True
    2. False
  4. If an employee is only occasionally required to report to a distant location (perhaps once per month or less), then the additional drive time may have to be paid.
    1. True
    2. False

Does travel time count as working time?: Answers

  1. True. When travel is considered as hours worked, the time must also be counted toward overtime.
  2. True. However, there are some cases where the time must be paid, such as unusual travel outside of the regular commute, travel to an additional jobsite, and more.
  3. True. On the other hand, carrying light hand tools between an employee’s home and the work site, involving no appreciable burden or inconvenience, is not hours worked.
  4. True. Employers might consider a commute to be “substantially” longer if the additional time can reasonably be recorded (such as 15 minutes or more).