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Inspections and response to releases
  • If a release is discovered during an inspection, the owner or operator must remove the affected portion of the unit from service and take all appropriate steps for repair and release containment.

Containment buildings must be inspected at least once every seven days, with all activities and results recorded in the operating log. Such inspections involve evaluation of unit integrity and visual assessment of adjacent soils and surface waters to detect any signs of waste release. Data from monitoring or leak detection equipment should also be considered.

Response to releases

If a release is discovered during an inspection, the owner or operator must remove the affected portion of the unit from service and take all appropriate steps for repair and release containment. The implementing agency must be notified of the discovery and of the proposed schedule for repair. Upon completion of all necessary repairs and cleanup, a qualified, registered, professional engineer must verify that the plan submitted to the implementing agency was followed. This verification need not come from an independent engineer.